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Old 02-26-2020, 11:52 AM
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Default Mission Bedroom Furniture

Hi there folks, been quite a while since I've visited. I've mostly been working on my house, getting ready to put it on the market for our retirement plans. We'll be moving from NYC down to the Chesapeake Bay area, close to Deltaville, Va. one of the prime old Va. boat building communities. In the meantime, we need some furniture, and can't afford to buy it! So I'm working on a bed headboard, and a pair of bedside tables. These pieces are pretty much straight out of the Stickley catalog, so no design revelations here. I like the style, it's easy to produce, and looks good.





The headboard is basically just a wall panel, that will hang on cleats. The bed frame will screw into the legs at the floor. The design is from the current Stickley catalog. The tables are a modified Harvey Ellis design. Below is a detail sheet of the tables. I drew these for myself, so none of the views are labeled. If things are not clear as to what view is what, I can go back and put labels on them. If anyone is interested.





The big departure from Mission style, however is material. I'm using Sipo/Sapele for the furniture, instead of oak. Heretical maybe, but I had a couple of nice boards on the rack to get started with, plus I wanted a redder color for the pieces, so here we go. Finish will be a toned Osmo Polyx oil. But I'm getting ahead of myself.





The wide board will make up the table tops. I had a couple of other smaller pieces which I've cut up as well. Lumber never goes as far as you think, so I had to make a trip out to Long Island for more wood, including an 8/4 plank for the legs. At this point, sipo is almost half the price of sapele, so that's mostly what I bought. The side panels, bed panels, and door panels are quartered ribbon sapele veneer on veneer core panel (they didn't have mdf core at the time). I'll try to get a pic of the sheet later today.


I'll pick this up again soon. In the meantime, thanks for looking!
Cricket
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Old 02-26-2020, 12:35 PM
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Default Re: Mission Bedroom Furniture

Cricket, thanks for posting this. Looking forward to following your build. Your craftsmanship is always inspiring.
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Old 02-27-2020, 04:20 AM
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Default Re: Mission Bedroom Furniture

A bedroom set for us is in my plans also, I will be following for ideas. I like to change to a different wood. I have been thinking of a Morris Chair in Cherry instead of Oak.
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Old 02-27-2020, 11:28 AM
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Default Re: Mission Bedroom Furniture

Quick post this morning before work.


The rest of the lumber for the project. 4/4, 5/4, and 8/4 sipo.



And the quartered ribbon sapele ply for the panels in the table sides, doors, and headboard. Some of the parts have been cut from this sheet already.


Next will be leg sorting and mortise layout. Stay tuned...
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Old 02-28-2020, 05:06 PM
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Default Re: Mission Bedroom Furniture

At this point, Iíve milled the legs and side panel rails to final dimension, and Iíve laid out and cut my joinery. These are fairly simple side tables, but itís still easy to make a mistake in the layout. The legs taper on one side only, as seen from the front and back, but remain full width and straight when viewed from the sides. The sides are mirror images, but the front and back are different from each other, and from the sides. I had to pick out the legs for best grain match to each other in the set, and also for sweep relative to the taper. To avoid confusion, I labeled the tops of the legs 1-4, starting from front left, moving clockwise to rear left.




It was crucial to know at all times which face was which on each leg.




Tapers are marked on all the legs.


I also made a poplar set up leg, but I had NO extras on the real thing. A mistake would be fatal. Also, the joinery had to be laid out to miss the taper. Sounds obvious, but is still something to recognize and keep track of. I set up the horizontal mortiser for the deep rail mortises in the legs. I could have used the Domino as well, but the mortiser is a little more accurate. Iíll have to get used to it though, after I move into a less well equipped shop. The mortises are laid out for lefts and rights, of course. We have flip stops on the machine which makes it straight forward.





Poplar leg set up in the mortiser. The panel groove is marked out here as well.



Tenons are all 1/4Ē x 3/4Ē, and the 1/4Ē panel grooves align with the mortise. I set up a 1/4Ē slotting tool in the router with a bearing to give me a 3/8Ē deep groove. The legs have stopped grooves, and the router is a little easier to do that with than the shaper.












This is the mortise for the smaller front rail of the tables.




Two sets of legs, all mortised and grooved.


Next time we'll look at rails and tenons. Stay tuned...
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Old 02-29-2020, 01:23 PM
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Default Re: Mission Bedroom Furniture

There are lots of ways to cut tenons, like a cope head and sliding table on the shaper, but for this small number of parts, I decided to just cut them on the table saw. I cut the shoulders first, then the cheeks, and I made the setup symmetrical (centered in the part) to make it easier to set up.








Since I still had the router set up for the legs, I used it to cut the rail panel grooves at the same time, but only after the tenons were cut, so I could align the two. Iíve been in the office now for 6 years, so my everyday shop skills have gotten rusty. I had to proceed carefully! Iím using haunched tenons on the top side rails, so that the panel grooves can run all of the way out the top of the legs.








I left the mortise ends round, and rounded the tenon ends. That is much faster than squaring the mortises.




At the same time that I was working all the tenons, I cut out the panels and put the tongues on them. I had to put all the components together and dry fit them. The tongues were cut on the shaper. There was an appropriate head already set up so I just had to set the height and fence.







This is the back face of the panel.


I mistakenly made the rail tenons 1/4Ē short of the inside rail edges, instead of 3/8Ē so I had to stop the panel groove in the rail short to keep from losing the tenon. And that required me to notch the tenon around the panel corner. Hard to explain, but I think the tenon photo shows what I mean.






With all the parts cut and tenons settled, I matched up the grain as best I could, and dry assembled the sides.







When I pulled the assemblies apart, I labeled the ends of the rails clearly, so they would go back in the right place during glue up.



The photos are a little out of order, but I think the process is clear.


Before gluing up, I still had to cut the arcs on the rails, and the tapers on he legs, then clean up the cuts.



Half width arc pattern, setup piece, and rail.




I used my trusty LN bronze block plane and Record spokeshave to deal with the interlocking sipo and sapele grain, and had very good luck hand planing with no tearout.




Glue up!






Glue up was the usual fire drill, but I got them done! I'm heading to the shop shortly to fit the interior parts. Stay tuned...
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Old 03-01-2020, 03:39 PM
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Default Re: Mission Bedroom Furniture

Nicely done (as usual). Thanks for taking the time for posting all of the steps along with your explanations. It makes it really clear for someone like myself that is constantly trying to learn about this craft. I also like the fact that you posted the one glitch along with that explanation. Nice to see that perfection can be arrived at in many different ways. I really appreciate your time on this project.
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Old 03-07-2020, 02:42 PM
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Default Re: Mission Bedroom Furniture

There are 3 interior shelf parts in each table to fabricate- bottom, adjustable shelf, and top. I chose to move the top down to drawer height, rather than use a drawer stretcher. The finished table top will cap the drawer enclosure. For expedience sake, I will use dovetailed drawer boxes on Blum undermount slides, rather than french fit drawers, and furthermore will order custom drawers from my usual supplier, Eagle Woodworking. Same as I do for any commercial project. But Iím getting ahead of myself. The shelf parts are made from sapele veneer on 3/4Ē MDF. I had a full sheet left over from some past job that looked pretty good. I put solid edges on them, and flush trimmed with a router.





The fits are a little fussy, having to notch around the legs to reach the interior panels. Plus, the drawer shelf notches are a slightly different depth than the bottom shelf notches, and front notches are different than rear notches. To keep things straight, I made a sketch of each shelf, and did the crosscutting and notching on the table saw.







That worked out pretty well, and the fits are good. I also had to cut back the tongue on the back panels to fit the stopped router groove in the legs. In retrospect, it would have been better to chop the groove square with a mortise chisel, to keep all of the joint buried in the leg. But thatís a small issue, in the scheme of things.



Trimmed tongue on the back panels.


Pretty good fit.


I carefully set up the parts on layout lines in the sides to prepare for interior joinery. This Iím doing with the Domino.







It was getting late in the day, but I was humming along so successfully with my fits and everything, that I decided to go ahead and start the domino mortises. Wrong. Should have quit while I was ahead. I made a little jig to set the shelf parts in for end plunging.





Because of the notch, the plunge depth is set deeper on the shelf than on the sides. When I made the first plunge into the inside of the bottom rail, I forgot to change the setting, and my first cut went completely through the the face of the part! Bloody catastrophe.



See the hole in the face of the rail?


My mind was working in overdrive to try to figure a way out of this mess. I eventually decided that the best approach would be to plug the hole, and cut a thin piece of veneer from sold stock to laminate over the whole rail. I could fit an entire piece over the rail, and flush trim the bottom edge after glue up. So that solution made me feel better, and I kept going with the rest of the cuts. When I finished the cuts, I looked at the side and realized that I had also set up on the wrong side of the bleeding line. I was on a catastrophic roll, so I packed up and went home. If I had not cut the leg mortises, I could have veneered over the inside of the rail as well, but thereís no cure for the holes in the legs. But on the way home, I realized that I could salvage the situation by simply raising the bottom up, and increasing the front bottom rail by 3/4Ē. If this were a commercial job, Iíd have to make the whole thing over, but Iím an easy client, so I accepted the design change with equanimity.



You can see a faint line below those mortises. The mortises were supposed to be below the line!



Todayís task will be to fix all the effups from last week. Stay tunedÖ.
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Old 03-08-2020, 05:46 PM
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Default Re: Mission Bedroom Furniture

I spent the day yesterday fixing mistakes, but Iím back in the pink now (Iíve had 45 years of practice fixing mistakes). First I grabbed a domino and glued that in the hole. When it cured, I cut it nearly flush with a little Japanese saw, the planed it flat.







I then slabbed off a piece of veneer from an appropriate board on the bandsaw, and cleaned up the saw marks with a block plane. Came out pretty flat. I cut it for a tight fit between the legs, and cut the curve just a speck proud to be flush trimmed after gluing.





I got the glue on, and clamped up through a caul (my poplar setup piece with the tenons cut off).






While that was curing, I got out two new front rails, left a tad wide, but cut exactly to length. I had to reset the table saw for the tenons, but I had the old rails to set up from, so that went pretty well. The new piece is wider, so the tenon looks a little funny, but it all works. With that fit, I sprang the curve and bandsawed that out, then cleaned it up.





I got my veneered part trimmed flush, and set up the whole assembly again.





So now we are back where we started. I was too tired to set up the domino again, so that will wait until next time. Thanks for looking!
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Old 03-10-2020, 03:37 AM
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Default Re: Mission Bedroom Furniture

I am getting some good ideas here. Can I ask why MDF instead of a ply like Baltic Birch? I just hate working with MDF and have been thinking of making bed rails from glued up BB beams covered in shop made Veneer. I am wondering about how thick one could make the shop made veneer with out worry of cracking due to expansion/ contraction climate issues. I was thinking of using Tightbond 3 being it seems to retain some flex when cured.


I sure wish I could figure out how to post such nice photos on this site, mine always are to big or turned sideways....



Mark
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