talkFestool  

Go Back   talkFestool > Projects, Methods, and Techniques > Woodworking Projects

Woodworking Projects Chairs to chests, boxes to breadboards? Stop in!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2018, 10:47 PM
Cricket's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard
Posts: 276
Default Re: Staked Stool

Finished eight siding the legs, and cut the tapered tenons in each one with a Veritas jig. Inexpensive, and works quite well. I got a 5/8" tapered cutter which is the largest one. 5/8" to 1-1/8" in 2-1/2". Good for staked furniture. Larger legs can have shoulders. Mine fair right into the tenon.


The tenons were worked close to eight sides, then 16, then round(ish) with a concave spokeshave.


Then the tenon cutter cut the finished taper. This took a bit of back and forth to get them down to size. I got pretty quick with it by the end.

Then I fit each leg to the seat, until I got some projection on the top side.








Thanks for looking.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2018, 11:55 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Oregon USA
Posts: 428
Default Re: Staked Stool

Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2018, 09:30 PM
Cricket's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard
Posts: 276
Default Re: Staked Stool

After fitting the leg tenons nicely, I roughed out the spindles and stretcher on the bandsaw. They look pretty crude in this state. I also bored the holes for the stretcher through tenons in the spindles before moving on.





I then clamped the spindles and stretcher to the legs to check proportions. I thought everything looked pretty good.





I then moved on to 16 siding, then shaving the legs round. I did not do any sanding at all, but left the tool marks from the concave spokeshave on the finished pieces.


I 16 sided first on the bench, then moved to the horse.





Now it's time to bore the mortise holes in the legs. I set up a little stack of blocks at the right height below the seat to mark out the mortise location. One important point here is that the wedge in the tenon leg needs to go across the annual rings of the legs, and perpendicular to the seat grain as well. The legs get rotated to the correct position, then their rotational position is marked on the leg and seat so the spindle mortise gets drilled in the correct orientation. It's a little fussy to get everything just right.


Here's the height block, marking the tenon centerline at each leg.


I used a laser, sitting on the stool bottom to check all the heights, and used it also to line my drill bit centerline up while boring. To drill, I rotated the leg slightly so the drill body could clear the adjacent leg. Worked great! In this pic you can see a hatch mark on the leg where it meets the seat. There's a hatch mark to line up with on the seat as well.

Next time, I'll finish shaping the spindles and stretcher, then get everything dry assembled.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 02-14-2018, 05:29 PM
Ausrob's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 507
Default Re: Staked Stool

Watching with great interest.

Rob
__________________
http://www.damnfinefurniture.com
I don't have as many tools as most people here...but Gee I've got some pretty hardwoods!
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 02-16-2018, 02:03 PM
Cricket's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard
Posts: 276
Default Re: Staked Stool

The two spindles and the stretcher were shaped just like the legs. Eight sided, sixteen sided, then round with block plane and spokeshaves.




The rough, bandsawn stretcher.


This tool cuts a 7/16" straight tenon (not tapered).


This pic shows tool marks that are left on the parts. They were only very lightly sanded to knock off fuzz.

The length of the spindles is critical, as the mortise is blind, and they are cut a tad long to build tension in the whole structure. It forces a little bend into the legs as the leg tenons get driven through the top. Those chairmakers are smart!





I cut the first one too short, and had to make another. With the spindles set into the legs, I measured the rough length of the stretcher. Everything was then disassembled, and wedge slots were cut into the tenon ends on legs and stretcher. Glue up is next. Stay tuned.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2018, 02:17 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 435
Default Re: Staked Stool

Fantastic step by step. Stool looks strong but so light! Amazing!
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2018, 05:20 PM
Cricket's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard
Posts: 276
Default Re: Staked Stool

Thanks Neil, it is very strong. In some ways I wish it were a little heavier visually just to inspire confidence in the structure, but I’ve gotten to like it. I might could have used a 1/2’ tenon instead of the 7/16” and that might just make a difference. Otherwise, I would need a shoulder on the tenon which I didn’t want for this stool.

A last step before glue up was to plane a shallow chamfer on the top edges, and a deeper one underneath, to visually lighten the 1-3/8” top. I do this on boat seats for the same reason. That bubinga is a little tricky, but with a steep bevel on the block plane, I got through it without too much tear out.





Anyway, on to the glue up. I knew I would need a lot of open time, as the whole business has to be glued up at once. I chose Old Brown Glue, which is a modified hide glue that comes in a bottle, and avoids all the glue pot mess. I like it quite a bit, and I just had enough time to get the legs driven up and the wedges hammered in before the glue grabbed.











I sawed off all the wedges next day, and cut all the legs level. I set the stool on the bench top, with all the corners of the seat the same distance up, and used a block and pencil to mark a line all around each leg. I sawed them off with my Dozuki, and block planed them smooth.




My old Ryoba, missing a few teeth. This was a jobsite saw. There's heavy paper with a hole cut out around the end of the leg to protect the seat from the saw.








Painting is next. Stay tuned….
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #18 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2018, 07:09 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Oregon USA
Posts: 428
Default Re: Staked Stool

PAINT?????
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2018, 07:42 PM
Cricket's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard
Posts: 276
Default Re: Staked Stool

The legs will be painted, not the top.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 02-18-2018, 12:19 PM
TahoeTwoBears's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: South Lake Tahoe, CA - Minden, NV
Posts: 1,428
Send a message via ICQ to TahoeTwoBears
Default Re: Staked Stool

I really like the bevel on the bottom edge. Nice touch.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:43 AM.