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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 10-15-2015, 01:58 PM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Thanks for sharing this build, Cricket!
It's great to actually see some woodworking on the forum. It's also nice to see what can be done with basic tools in skilled hands.
Thank you
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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 10-15-2015, 06:49 PM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

With the keelson, chines, stem, and transom are on the boat, the next step is to bevel all the surfaces that the planking will land on and get fastened to. This is necessarily a "winding bevel" because the cross sectional shape is constantly changing down the length of the hull. Epoxy is pretty forgiving, and capable of filling some pretty rude gaps, but that's not the way I like to build. And I certainly don't want to teach it that way to others, so we are pretty careful to get our pieces fair and beveled correctly. This is fairly simple on a chine hull as opposed to a rounded hull, and we can employ some simple tools to help us get there, which we'll get to presently.





Back aft, the bevels are small, and relatively constant, or at least change slowly. We use a drawknife and jack plane to get close to the line. I like to establish the bevels at each station by running a sawcut across the piece to beveled, in plane with the mold edge. I then connect all the cuts with a batten and draw a fair line running down the length of the piece. Sorry I don't have a pic of that.

Up forward, the bevels get interesting, and change rapidly. This is due to the very fine entry, and extreme dedarise in the forward sections, a hallmark of the deadrise boats from the Chesapeake, on which this boat is modeled.






That pic shows how much material is being removed from the keelson up forward.



I use a piece of steel angle to check my bevels. The straight edge must touch everywhere, with no daylight showing. It's tricky for novices to keep the bevels flat and not convex (slight concavity across the surface is ok, and even desirable). To keep the planes flat, I devised a sanding tool by sticking sandpaper onto the angle iron, and running that like a fairing board across the faying surfaces.


You can see the 80 grit paper here...


...and in use here.



I hate to make mistakes, much less admit to them, but I over cut the stem bevel where it fairs into the keelson. I precut it on the bench, and made a mistake in the bearding layout as it comes across the knee. So we had to do a little back-filling in this region, with some cedar and some fairing compound, to get the bevels right. Won't matter in the long run, just annoying. There is a lot of stem to remove in this very fine bow, and it took a bit of work. We were glad that it was fir and not white oak!





There is so much bearing surface on the stem for the planking to land on, that I don't worry about a little low density filler. We use a lot of screws in the planking as well. The important thing is to keep the lands fair!



I'll leave off here. Next time we start planking!
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 10-16-2015, 12:22 AM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

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Originally Posted by Leakyroof View Post
Really nice work and explanations. Knowing next to nothing about boats and their construction, this has been a real treat with all the lingo.
yea, I've been doing quite a bit of googling on terms from this thread
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old 10-16-2015, 02:37 PM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Thanks everyone for the comments. Okami, I appreciate your assessment of my skills which I consider to be only moderate! Building boats doesn't take a lot of fancy tools, and a lot of it makes sense with hand tools, where a funny cut is much quicker with a back saw say, than some unwieldy set up on a table saw. I'm no hand tool nut, but a basic kit of quality tools goes a long way. My $50 vintage Stanley #5 gets a lot of use.

I thought I'd take a little break for a sidebar on the influences of the type of boat we are building. This big skiff is a direct descendant of the deadrise powered workboats (themselves descended from log canoes, sailing skiffs, skipjacks, and the like) of the Chesapeake Bay. I lived on the bay myself for a time, and worked in an old boatyard that built and maintained such boats. This was back in the late 70's, close to the end of the viable commercial building of wooden work boats on the bay. Our skiff is quite a bit like the crab scrapes from Smith Island, and bar cats from Tangier. Please note: I did not take any of these pictures myself. They are all swiped off the web, and my intention is only to highlight the great work of others, not to claim authorship for myself.






This a recent, traditionally built scrape from the lines of Darlene, a famous Smith Island boat. The builder, who goes by the handle Wollybugger on the Wooden Boat Forum, built this wonderful boat. His blog is Building the Stella R - A Chesapeake Crab Scrape



Here are a couple of shots from the Mariners Museum in Newport News, Va. of John Belvin, a well known old time builder from Glouscester County, Va.





This is real deal. Our boat is of the traditional form, but is built with modern materials. Our construction is a little more forgiving of living ashore for half the year. She'll never shrink up and leak, or need to be re-caulked before launching. Those old boats were only hauled for bottom work, or repairs, and lived their lives without the wetting and drying cycles from winter storage. But that is a lengthy topic in itself.

The final fruition of the classic deadrise work boat is well illustrated by this shot of the Barbara J, which is used for trotlining for hard crabs.



And this boat which harvests oysters with patent tongs.



This whole subject can fill many books! I've enjoyed researching these boats, and have spent a lot of tool $$ on books.

We'll get back to planking next time. I'm off to the boat shop for 3 good days work!
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old 10-16-2015, 04:07 PM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Are you going to leave your boat as an open deck or add a forward pilot house to shelter the Watermen on bad days?
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 10-16-2015, 04:19 PM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Open deck, center console. I need the cockpit volume for the work we'll do. We carry a lot of racing buoys and a couple crew, so as much as I'd like a pilot house, with a couple bunks, that's another boat.

BTW, I noticed I need to resize a couple of those last pics. I have to scroll on my laptop, which I hate. I'll do it later.

Cricket
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  #37 (permalink)  
Old 10-16-2015, 05:23 PM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Might have missed it, but is this a for profit company type build, bunch of friends hanging out having fun building a boat or something else?

Very cool thread, thanks for "bringing" us along.
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  #38 (permalink)  
Old 10-17-2015, 12:19 AM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Rutager, our boat is being built for the use of our own boat club (Sebago Canoe Club). We are an all volunteer, not for profit organization of sailors, sea kayakers, and canoeists. Our club is 85 years old, and we have been in the Brooklyn location since the early 60's.

We are building the boat to replace the old 13' Boston Whaler that is our safety boat, sail instruction vessel, and regatta management boat. The sailors give the boat the most use. This will be a flagship of sorts. She'll live at our dock from April to November of each year. I'm the group leader on this project of willing apprentices. There is a lot of interest in the project, as you can imagine. Our Board of Directors approved the budget for the build.

Cricket
ps, I resized the offending images from the last post. Works better, though images may still be large for tablet viewing. Depends on how this website is set up. I tend to organize things in a way that appears correct on my Macbook Pro, a 13"er.
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  #39 (permalink)  
Old 10-18-2015, 03:48 AM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Here we go with the planking. The topsides get planked first, all the way to the bow, then the bottom goes on. The planking for this boat is 3/4" thick Meranti plywood which is basically Phillipine Mahogany. It is heavier than Occume (Gaboon) but stronger and more rot resistant. That is pretty heavy planking for a 23' boat, but it will require very little internal framing. It will get one layer of 6 oz glass outside only.

We made quick plank patterns out of chipboard (from the crate the meranti came in), and then cut the actual planks. This is easy planking, at least until we get to the forefoot.


Hans is laying out the first sheet of ply. It will be cut with the skil saw there.

The plank is dry fitted, temp screwed, and the internal structure is traced off on the plank so we know where the glue is supposed to go. We put the plank back on the bench, and tape off the areas where we don't want glue. We do this inside the boat as well, to keep everything as clean as possible. I hate sanding off dried glue! For me, it's a point of pride as well, to have as immaculate a structure as I can.





When the plank is hung, we get inside the boat, and clean up the squeeze out, then pull the tape off. You don't want to leave it on!

The topsides planks are joined with butt blocks, which is a strap the same thickness as the hull, and about 5" wide. The butt block straddles the joint in the two pieces of ply. It takes a little fairing to get the next sheet to lay nice and flush.




Here's what it looks like on the boat.

We'll look at the topsides bow planking next time.
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  #40 (permalink)  
Old 10-18-2015, 05:30 PM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cricket View Post
Here we go with the planking. The topsides get planked first, all the way to the bow, then the bottom goes on. The planking for this boat is 3/4" thick Meranti plywood which is basically Phillipine Mahogany. It is heavier than Occume (Gaboon) but stronger and more rot resistant. That is pretty heavy planking for a 23' boat, but it will require very little internal framing. It will get one layer of 6 oz glass outside only.

We made quick plank patterns out of chipboard (from the crate the meranti came in), and then cut the actual planks. This is easy planking, at least until we get to the forefoot.


Hans is laying out the first sheet of ply. It will be cut with the skil saw there.

The plank is dry fitted, temp screwed, and the internal structure is traced off on the plank so we know where the glue is supposed to go. We put the plank back on the bench, and tape off the areas where we don't want glue. We do this inside the boat as well, to keep everything as clean as possible. I hate sanding off dried glue! For me, it's a point of pride as well, to have as immaculate a structure as I can.





When the plank is hung, we get inside the boat, and clean up the squeeze out, then pull the tape off. You don't want to leave it on!

The topsides planks are joined with butt blocks, which is a strap the same thickness as the hull, and about 5" wide. The butt block straddles the joint in the two pieces of ply. It takes a little fairing to get the next sheet to lay nice and flush.




Here's what it looks like on the boat.

We'll look at the topsides bow planking next time.
Silly question, how is the planking attached to these butt blocks?
Just glued?
And do the blocks float or slip fit against the hull or are they fastened somewhere that I couldn't spot in the picture?
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