talkFestool  

Go Back   talkFestool > Projects, Methods, and Techniques > Woodworking Projects

Woodworking Projects Chairs to chests, boxes to breadboards? Stop in!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 10-10-2015, 12:27 AM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: NorCal
Posts: 340
Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cricket View Post
That's the trestles. We'll set up the strongback frame next time. I'll put the coffee pot on....



Cricket
Are my eyes deceiving me...seems like your stove has no pipe?
__________________
---
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 10-10-2015, 03:54 AM
Cricket's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard
Posts: 251
Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

There's a stove pipe there, Paul G. It's just rusted the same color as the wall behind it, so it kind of disappears in the pic. Anyway, on to the strong back.

The strong back is a ladder frame structure built of 2 x 8 fir, 24' long x 4' wide, set up on the trestles. We picked out our lumber, let it dry a little, then jointed and ripped each board true before assembling the structure on the trestles.



I'm perusing the plans while Hans cuts notches in the cross pieces for a taut string line down the center of the structure.



The molds are marked out from full size templates in this plan set. We found the set up to be very fair and accurate. We punched through the templates with a sharp nail right onto the flake bd. mold stock, marking all edges and notches for keelson, chines, and sheer clamps.



This chine-hulled boat is all straight lines, so the molds could be cut with our home made track saw. No budget this year for the TS 55.



We used the strong back itself for the cutting table. One team did the layout while another team did the cutting. This is a group project, with plenty of willing hands, eager to learn more about boat building. This is a fairly ambitious project. It's a simple enough boat, but the structure is large with a lot of surface area, and large(ish) components. Some of the group are first time boat builders. I've built quite a few boats, but this is my first serious power boat. The team is stoked!

I'll continue with the mold setup tomorrow.
Cricket
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 10-10-2015, 06:52 PM
Cricket's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard
Posts: 251
Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

All the molds are cut, and stacked in order.



The station grid was laid out on the strong back, and cross bearers were screwed down. The molds will be then screwed to the appropriate face of these.



Each mold has a vertical centerline, and a horizontal waterline. The C/L is set right above the string line, and the mold is carefully shimmed so that the waterline comes right to a predetermined laser line.





One nice thing about steel buildings, is we can hang a magnetic laser mount almost anywhere. You can just make out the orange laser line on this mold.We carefully shimmed up all the molds such that the DWL marked on the molds came right into line with the laser. We also scribed that benchmark onto the walls at several points around the room so we could come back to the same spot to check alignment later in the process. We had some very cold weather during this process, and I was worried a little about frost heave. We had some minor shifting, due more to the fir strong back acclimating to the wood stove being off and on, off and on. A couple of weeks later some small adjustments were made in the set up.

One note about the waterline. That represents the Datum, or Designed Waterline of the boat, which is the actual waterplane of the vessel in normal trim. The DWL is parallel to the baseline (top of strong back) and some exact distance above it (don't remember the dimension offhand). That's why it's handy to get the strong back set as level as possible, to reduce the amount of shimming necessary at each mold. We used at most 1/8" of shim, usually only a sixteenth or less.



The molds are rigidly braced plumb, and at the correct distance apart.



Here is a batten set into the chine notch, to check for fairness. If one mold is out of alignment, or screwy in some way, the batten will let you know. It's a bit of an art, knowing which mold to correct, and in what way. This set up proved pretty fair, with not much correction needed. Doug Hylan is a respected designer and builder of serious boats, with a yard on the Benjamin River (Penobscott Bay) in Maine.

Next time, we'll look at the keelson, chines, and sheer clamps. We found some beautiful doug fir!
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 10-10-2015, 09:22 PM
Poto's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 8,974
Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Perhaps I'm not looking at things from the right direction, but those doors don't look big enough to get a boat through...
__________________
I don't have as many Festools as Fred. Or Marcou's, or Brese's, or Lie-Nielsen's, or Lee Valley's, or Blue Spruce's, or Harold and Saxon's, or...
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 10-10-2015, 11:06 PM
Cricket's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard
Posts: 251
Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

The door op'g is about 7 1/2 feet wide. Boat is 6'10". It will be a close thing with the rolling frame I need to assemble. The boat itself will fit, though. I just saw a project where the builder cut a hole through his roof in order to crane in the big diesel. Couldn't get it in the shop past the boat.

I think we'll be okay though.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 10-11-2015, 03:34 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Oregon USA
Posts: 354
Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Very nice bench!
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 10-11-2015, 05:34 AM
Corwin's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Washington
Posts: 1,110
Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Sheesh! Looks like you guys work right along!

Years ago I was at a kayak symposium where a builder was displaying his designs. Looking at the boats I could see that two of them had, well, a bump, if you will, along the shear line just back from the bow. Seemed an obvious mistake. Interesting to see the considerations you've take into account and the steps that you have done to get your project starting off on the right foot.

Thanks for posting!
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #18 (permalink)  
Old 10-11-2015, 03:34 PM
Cricket's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard
Posts: 251
Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Full disclosure, Corwin. This project was begun last winter. The strong back went up in March, and the molds in April. But still, we are moving along briskly. Approaching roll over soon, and I will try to bring the project posts up to date as time allows.

With the molds up, we made a trip out to Condons Lumber in White Plains for some doug fir. I called ahead, and had them bring in some hunks of 5/4 and 8/4 from the Stormville yard. I didn't know what to expect, sight unseen, but we had some beautiful, tight grained vg rough sawn boards to pick from. We paid dear for it- $6.25 a bd ft., but I'm frankly grateful there are still logs like that to be found, and it should be dear. Let's just not give it away to the Chinese.




I deviated from Doug Hylan's specs a little bit, deciding to build the keelson solid- 1-1/2" thick, and 5-1/2" wide, instead of a fir-ply-fir sandwich. I'd be happy with either arrangement, but the solid is less work. The stem was called out at 4 layers of 18mm meranti. I did not want to bevel through all the glue lines, after a real battle with my solid ply plank keel on the Matinicus, so I opted for an inner layer of 18mm meranti, and two outer skins of fir, for a total thickness of about 2-15/16". The chine logs and sheer clamps are 1" thick x 2" wide. All of the longitudinals were dressed square, then scarfed up to length on the bench, then ripped out and planed to finished width and thickness.



This shot is before we got the bandsaw out there. We cut as deep as possible from both sides, and finished out the cut with the ryoba. The cut is just rough, as these 12:1 scarfs are hand planed to finish.





Once all planed nice (and this takes just a few minutes), we set up the beams to glue the scarf.





The glue up gives a board roughly 1-5/8" x 6" x 25' long for the keelson. A big hunk of wood. The 25' timbers are pretty straight when they come off the beams, but I trued up one edge of each timber with a fore plane to take care of any local humps around the scarf, then ran the pieces on each face and each edge through the planer to final dimension. Each pair of chine logs and sheer clamps was gotten from one 1" x 4-1/2" board, ripped down the middle and edge planed.

Again, thanks for looking!
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 10-11-2015, 07:13 PM
Poto's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 8,974
Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Cool! What do you use for a planer (motorized)?
__________________
I don't have as many Festools as Fred. Or Marcou's, or Brese's, or Lie-Nielsen's, or Lee Valley's, or Blue Spruce's, or Harold and Saxon's, or...
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2015, 01:15 AM
Cricket's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard
Posts: 251
Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

I set up my 80's vintage Delta 13" planer, and 8" Powermatic jointer.





I'll continue with the transom and stem later.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
boat building, boat shop, workbench

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:34 AM.