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  #181 (permalink)  
Old 02-16-2017, 06:23 PM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

This past weekend, we trimmed the deck to the hull and gave the outboard edge a roundover. The carlin, we found, had moved around a bit and was no longer fair, so rather than trim the deck to the carlin, we cut the deck fair and trimmed the carlin (in some places a little proud of the deck edge) to fit.

The deck was trimmed close with a jig saw set on the least bevel, then trimmed close with a slick, and tuned up with sharp #5. The inner edge as I said, was precut fair and smooth.







Because of the topsides and transom angle, using a bearing on the round over bit would overcut the edge a little, so instead, we sprung a batten around the deck and ran the router base against that. A little block plane and sandpaper work tuned the round over fair to the eye.





The deck cleaned up and radiused.



The carlin was trimmed to the deck in a few places, and will be shimmed in others.




After the holes were plugged and filled, we ground a little hollow in the deck seams, and laid in some glass tape.








After fairing, we are going to cover the whole deck with xynole, hopefully this weekend.

Stay tuned...
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  #182 (permalink)  
Old 02-22-2017, 06:28 PM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

This past weekend, we covered the decks with Xynole cloth from Defender. I've not used this (or Dynel either for that matter) before, so I was a little concerned how it might behave. But I loved it. Easy to cut (with electric shears) and very flexible, laying over the tight radius corners easily. It was a big piece of fabric though, as we put it on in one piece with no seams. The cloth is 60 wide, and the deck almost 7 feet, but we split it up the middle all the way to the fore deck, and it stretched around the sheer with no trouble. We taped it down and squeegeed the epoxy on (we masked the entire boat with plastic first, inside and out). Went great.


The fabric will be trimmed to the top of the blue tape line, and the seam gets buried behind the rubrail. Plastic on boat to keep the epoxy off the topsides...


...and the insides too.


We took the cloth outside to cut. 70 degrees on sunday!


I had read that the xynole was hard to cut, so I bought an electric shears. Love it!



We slit the cloth up the centerline as far as the fore deck, then rolled it back on the tube. We put the cloth up on deck, and unrolled it just past the fore deck, then cut the tube in half and rolled each half out on the side decks.












The cloth is only 60" wide, and the deck almost 7 feet, but the cloth is flexible enough to "bend" around the sheer. the weave distortion is barely noticeable. The fabric was carefully smoothed out on the deck. We were very careful to keep the fabric and deck clean, with no crap in or under the cloth. The fabric was then taped down so it wouldn't move.



And wet out carefully with squeegees, mixing only about 6 oz of epoxy at a time.





We finished the wet out late in the day, so Howie and I came in at 7am Monday to trim the cloth and get a second coat of epoxy on.

It was a little past the "green" stage, but I was able to cut along the tape line, and peel the extra cloth off the hull. The blue tape was absolutely critical for this. I cut right at the top of the tape line and peeled off tape and fabric in one go. The inside deck edge was just sliced off with a sharp knife.




We'll put a fillet at the stem joint.

We will evaluate the filling of the weave this coming weekend, and see if we need more epoxy. The idea is to leave the weave visible, like canvas. I don't have pics of the second coat yet, had to dash to work. But here are a couple more trimmed shots.





That was a lot of pics. Hope you all don't mind! Thanks for looking.
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  #183 (permalink)  
Old 02-23-2017, 03:20 AM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Always a pleasure to see the progress!
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  #184 (permalink)  
Old 02-26-2017, 02:51 PM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Making progress. We bought some 4/4 and 5/4 red oak for coaming and rubrail on Friday, then got that material all dressed and scarfed to length on Saturday. The red oak glues a little better with epoxy than the white oak, and is cheaper. Less than $4 a bd.' I wouldn't use it down in the bilge because of low rot resistance and its' capillary action, but the rubrail and coaming get sealed up and painted pretty good. We'll see over time how it holds up.

We got the xynole decks all sanded and prepped, ready to get the coamings and rubrails. Hope to be painting the exterior in a couple of weeks.


These boards are 4/4 x 15" wide (all they had in 4/4). We split these down the middle, and scarfed them to length. The coamings will be mostly quarter sawn when done.


Roughed out the scarfs on the bandsaw.


We sanded the planed surfaces with 60 grit before gluing.


Used a little heat over-night.



Going out to the shop a little later today, after two intense days Friday and Saturday. Still plenty to do.
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  #185 (permalink)  
Old 02-27-2017, 01:20 PM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

This is still one of the most interesting threads I've ever seen. Great work!
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  #186 (permalink)  
Old 02-28-2017, 06:46 PM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Thanks guys.
The fabric deck wraps over the transom edge, but there is no rubrail back there to bury the seam in, so we ground the edge back a little, removed some primer, and put on some fairing.







So we'll call the deck fabric done for now. We pulled out the elliptical coaming that we glued up months ago, and got that clamped back up to mark out for cutting top and bottom. Next weekend, we'll do that, and fit the straight pieces that we scarfed up to it.




Starting to look like something we can possibly use fairly soon!
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  #187 (permalink)  
Old 03-04-2017, 04:34 AM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Fantastic photos and descriptions. I had never seen the fabric and epoxy applied. You make it look SO easy. I have trouble getting epoxy into joints with it getting all over me and everything else.

What's the work time from when you lay the epoxy on the fabric and a I guess squeegee it out until it's getting tacky and you have to stop messing with it? It's such a big area I can imagine you are working it in phases.

Also, is the entire external hull also fiberglas covered in the same way?

I do wish this was all captured on video. It would make an amazing YouTube series.

Thanks for all the effort to share your work - the craftsmanship and attention to detail in construction and documentation is great.

neil
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  #188 (permalink)  
Old 03-05-2017, 10:38 PM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Just spent a couple hours catching up on this thread. Great Stuff!
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  #189 (permalink)  
Old 03-06-2017, 02:00 AM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Thanks for looking. Neil, the epoxy is mixed in small batches, about 6 to 8 oz at a time, and applied. We use slow hardener, and have plenty of time that way to get the fabric wet out before moving on to the next section. Overlapping application is no problem. The epoxy will kick in the container if you are not careful, but once spread out the heat dissipates. First rule of epoxy- get it out of the container! It has to cure to green stage before applying another coat, and subsequent coats are best applied before the previous one has fully cured. Next day is okay with System 3 epoxy.

The entire exterior is sheathed with 6 oz plain weave fiberglass. But I like the Xynole so well, I'll use that in the future. Here are some images from the hull glassing.







The glass was wet out and squeegeed on day one, and then on day two, two more coats went on to fill the weave.





I'll have some some more up to date stuff to post tomorrow or the next day. Thanks again!
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  #190 (permalink)  
Old 03-07-2017, 02:14 AM
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Default Re: Boat Shop Bench- New Boat Project

Busy weekend, though I wish I had gotten more done. Always takes longer than you think, hope, or want. We cut the mortise for the bitt block through the foredeck. That mortise was already made into the deck blocking underneath. Just had to drill a hole and run a flush trim bit around it.







We also scribed the bow coaming height and cut it out.







Took this outside on the picnic table to plane fair. I then cut a half lap joint where the straight sections of coaming meet the elliptical bow section. I set up a router for this, but due to the curvature, could not easily get a consistent lap depth, so as so often happens I ended up cutting the laps by hand. If I had started that way from the beginning, I would have saved myself a bit of time. A pair of Japanese saws and a rabbet plane made short work of the joint.







The elliptical coaming ends were marked on the carlins, and the length of the lap noted. We then offered up the straight section planks for marking out to shape.



The planks bent in fairly easy, though the curve quickens up near the elliptical section. I knew it would bend easier once ripped to width, so we marked it out and cut it with a skil saw. It's still rough width until the half laps are fitted nicely, so we can move up and down a bit.









That's about as far as we got. We'll do the final trim, fit and install this Friday. Thanks again for looking.
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