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Old 07-28-2015, 02:19 AM
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Default Farm table - part 1

Finished up a farm table with extensions that my son wanted to make for a friend of his.

Overall dimensions are 64 long x 41 wide by about 29 high without extensions. Each extension adds about 18 inches to the length.

First time working with rough sawn wood on a completed project, so we learned a lot. Wood was oak with heavy saw marks. It was a strong 5/4 dimension but not consistent across the range of boards. It was actually not reclaimed wood as there were no nail holes in it. We used wire brushes to clean up the 'show side' of the work and then a light sanding with the Rotex and ETS 150/3. This did a pretty good job of cleaning up the grain and giving a more consistent color to the wood.

The pieces were edge ripped with the TS55 which worked really well and then thickness sanded on my Performax unit, sanding them down to 1" thickness. This took a LONG time but I did not want to put the pieces through my planer and risk blade damage.

The top pieces were glued up in two sections. I chose not to use Dominos since I had to manually slip the pieces to get alignment across the surface on the rough sawn wood. We glued up each of the two halves of the top, running them through the joiner to ensure I had a top that was close to flat. I ended up making small adjustments on each joint to compensate for any curve across the face of the pieces. Then we glued up the two halves in a final glue up.

We made the table to accommodate 18" extension leaves on each end - using pull-out extensions that the leaves slipped over for registration. This was far easier than trying to put the leaves in the middle of the table. Plus the client wanted

In order to have a consistent width and easy motion for the extension mechanism, I used my CNC mill to mill a consistent pocket though the interior frame on each of the pieces. I also used the CNC on the corner brackets for the gooves and holes for the corner brackets.

Side aprons were attached to the top with pocket screws. I did elongate the pocket screw holes to compensate for possible wood movement.

Legs were laminated stock that were tapered on the inside faces and then attached with lag bolts into the corner brackets.

We finished the table with three coats of satin poly.

About 60 hours of work in total, so a pretty quick project. Most of the time was cleaning up the show face and figuring out how to align it for a flat surface.

Fun project! Attached are photos and I have a Sketchup file if anyone is interested, PM me with an email address.

Feedback welcome -

neil
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Last edited by neilc; 07-28-2015 at 02:31 AM.
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Old 07-28-2015, 02:25 AM
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Default Farm table - part 2

Additional photos from the farm table build...

Feedback or questions welcome -

Neil
Attached Thumbnails
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Last edited by neilc; 07-28-2015 at 02:32 AM.
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Old 07-28-2015, 05:26 AM
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Default Re: Farm table - part 1

I like it very much! Thanks for posting your projects, it is peaking my interest to get busy building after the move is done. I get to visit my new shop tomorrow.
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Old 07-28-2015, 03:14 PM
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Default Re: Farm table - part 1

Neil,

My wife wants me to build a few things out of reclaimed lumber and the problem that I've had is how to finish it. I've seen a bunch of this stuff in Montana and it looks rough, but doesn't give up slivers when you run your fingers across it. Is that the texture/finish you achieved with the poly?

Thanks,

Mike
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Old 07-28-2015, 04:37 PM
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Default Re: Farm table - part 1

Wow, Neil! Nice job! That rough-sawn look certainly gives the table a certain feel and texture. I like the balance and proportions of the table - great job. It must have been fun working with your son.

I'm surprised you used pocket screws instead of dominos for the joinery. I've found that dominos work pretty well, even for butt joints.

But mostly I'm really envious of your big, bright, clean shop!!!
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Old 07-28-2015, 08:05 PM
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Default Re: Farm table - part 1

Mike -

We used a wire brush by hand followed by the Festool 150/3 sander with 320 grit paper to lightly sand the roughness. This plus the three coats of poly removed any roughness for the most part. No risk of splinters. i was also thinking about spilled food that could get into the rough finish and seep in. Overall, I think the three coats will give it good protection.

Peter -

Yes it was fun working with my son. He's gaining confidence and loves working on projects. The design was largely his on the table. We've built a lot of furniture in his apartment so far. And when he finally buys a home with his wife later this year, I'm sure my stock of tools will need to be under lock and key!

Two challenges with the dominos as I saw it -

For the top pieces on both the main table and the leaves, it would have removed any chance of 'fudging' the individual pieces up or down to gain alignment. Given the top pieces were not a consistent depth (you can see some example of this looking at the bottom undercarriage photos) I was concerned about alignment on the top, knowing that you could not sand away any misalignment. Plus being rough wood, they were not as straight as pieces we'd normally want in 'fine' woodworking. Plus there were some pieces which were cupped and I ended up taking a small angle with the jointer to adjust these angles to flatten the top with the Festool level across the face.

For the aprons, Dominos would not have allowed the movement for the top without still using screws - figure 8 fasteners, tabletop fasteners, or in my case, the pocket screws. I did use tabletop fasteners on the interior rails of the undercarriage for the extensions. But I was not confident dominos that were not able to be glued in place on the aprons would add much in the way of structural strength.

Make sense?

Thanks for the comments!

neil
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Old 07-28-2015, 09:33 PM
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Default Re: Farm table - part 1

I can certainly see using the pocket screws to hold the top on (or any of the other solutions you suggested). I was thinking more about the cross-pieces joining the apron underneath the table. I used dominos when I did that for my table (also used them to join the apron to the legs). It hasn't fallen apart yet!

The colors that you got with the sort of semi-sanded wood are really nice. I bet the table is just going to get more beautiful as it ages.

How did the people like it?
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Old 07-29-2015, 01:05 AM
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Default Re: Farm table - part 1

Peter -

Now I get your question. Yes I did debate using dominos for the cross braces but had the pocket screw jig set up and went that way with it. But they definitely would have worked in that application.

I wanted the legs to be removable due to transport especially getting it out of a basement workshop and up to a third floor loft condo. So Dominos for the legs would have been a challenge.

The couple that we made it for loved it. She picked up eight assorted chairs from her grandmother and painted them in various colors and is using them around the table. I have not seen it but my son says it looks great!

Having done this table, I can see the appeal of the reclaimed, natural wood. It has great warmth to it and does feel timeless. With seating for at least 8 for a young couple, it's got room to grow too!

neil
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Old 07-29-2015, 06:37 PM
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Default Re: Farm table - part 1

Nice!
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Old 07-30-2015, 04:17 AM
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Default Re: Farm table - part 1

Great table, Neil! You have been busy since last we met!

Tables are always a special project, because around them are shared good times and bad, life's joys and sorrows, and many a great meal.
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