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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 11-28-2013, 05:59 PM
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Default Re: Planked Half Model

Happy Thanksgiving! I got some stuff chopped up for the stuffing, then was free to go for a while, so I'm at the shop this afternoon, working on another model. More later on that. In the meanwhile...



I made the rubrails from Spanish cedar. They are tapered in thickness and width in the ends of the boat. This visually lightens the sheer, and gives a little extra uplift. I padded on a coat of amber shellac before gluing the rails on.

I primed the whole model with gesso, 3 coats, sanded in between. I wanted a painted waterline and bottom, so I propped the model up level (with the waterline) and used an appropriately thick block to scribe the level line with. The pics make it clear.



Then I taped off the waterline. Its tricky painting a level line around a lapstrake boat, where he line crosses the lap. I think you ca see what's going on in the next pic.



I'm using casein paint for the model. It's a little hard to find anymore, but I like it for it's soft, dead flat finish. It sands beautifully. After painting, I'll wax the whole thing.

More later...
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Old 12-07-2013, 08:23 PM
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Default Re: Planked Half Model

I have yet to get any worthwhile pics of the finished model, but here's a couple. I'll have to drag out the tripod and some lights.







In the meantime, I'm working on another planked half model. This is the same peapod I built full size. I wanted to have a record of the hull to hang on the wall-the sheer is so pretty. I'll upload some pics of that as I go along. I also ordered several sets of drawings from the H I Chapelle collection at the Smithsonian. I'm going to do some full planked models next.
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Old 12-07-2013, 09:46 PM
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Stunning! I want one!

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Old 12-07-2013, 10:27 PM
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Default Re: Planked Half Model

+1......................
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Old 12-08-2013, 12:24 AM
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Default Re: Planked Half Model

What a beauty!!!
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Old 12-13-2013, 06:47 PM
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Default Re: Planked Half Model

That's beautiful, cricket. Very good photography too.
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Old 12-23-2013, 04:30 PM
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Default Re: Planked Half Model

I've been working on another half model, this time I'm doing the Matinicus peapod that I already built full size. I don't get to look at it enough, so I wanted a model to hang on the wall. I plan to do a series of models in the coming months, but I may switch to whole models, with full interiors. I've enjoyed the process and challenge. Boats as objects are complex things, with a lot of changing curves, and as such are rewarding to construct, full size or to scale. I'm using the same 1:8 as with the dory.


Here's a murky pic of the lines plan.

I start by cutting a backer that is the exact profile of the boat at the C/L. I draw the mold locations square to the baseline (or a waterline, same thing). The backer is spanish cedar, with grain running longways. To make the stem profile stronger, I let in pieces with the grain running vertical.


Tracing the profile right from the lines plan. I draw on tracing paper or vellum, then glue it w/ spray adhesive right to the backer, to be cut out on the bandsaw.


The mold locations and stem pieces are shown here.


The molds are traced and cut out on the bandsaw in the same way.


The sawn out molds are then glued carefully to the profile backer. I used a masked off block to ensure the molds are set square and plumb.

I'll continue this later, after some late in the game xmas shopping.
Cricket
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Old 12-25-2013, 05:16 PM
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Default Re: Planked Half Model

Merry Christmas everyone! I've got a few minutes to kill before running out to boatshop, so I'll continue the thread.

One nice thing about modeling is that I get to buy some new, specialized tools. I got a nice detail dozuki from Lee Valley, and a pair of detail chisels- 1/16 and 1/8. The little diamond file is handy too.



This boat has a flat plank keel. For the model, I made this from spanish cedar. It proved much easier to bevel than the 1" thick keel on the full size boat!


The keel rests on flats worked onto the molds. The pencil line drawn on the keel represents the rabbet line, and the outboard edge of the keel is the bearding line. The keel is beveled from the bearding line to the rabbet. When planked, another outer keel piece goes on top.


This pic shows how the keel bevel works, and how that winding bevel fairs into the stem.


This sketch shows two ways to do the plank to keel joint. I used the top one on the full sized boat.

Once the keel is beveled, the garboard plank goes on. I measure the girths at each mold, from rabbet to sheer, then divide that by the number of planks (7) to get rough widths at each mold. I used a little batten to line off a fair curve, marking the exact position on each mold, and at the stems. I use bristol board strips laid on the molds to make plank patterns. I have a picture of that that will come up later on. The plank is cut out on the bandsaw (with a very fine blade), faired with a block plane and spokeshave, and then glued on the boat with cyanoacrylate glue along with a few bits of skin from my fingertips. Its hard to clamp such a small thing, and there is significant force needed to twist and bend this plank in place. Its a juggling act with glue and clothespins and fingers. The planks get progressively easier to hang as we move up towards the sheer.


Here's a shot of the first batten as it merges with the stem. The plank is not on yet, just the batten. I decided to leave these battens in place on the model, letting them into the molds. They are useful for marking out plank shapes, and the planks can be glued to them as well. This is where those little detail chisels come in handy. On an actual boat, these battens are not (usually) left on.

Next time, I'll show the rest of the plank battens and line-off.
Cricket

Last edited by Cricket; 12-25-2013 at 05:20 PM.
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2013, 04:38 PM
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Default Re: Planked Half Model

The first plank to go on is the garboard. I put this plank on, then do the rest of the line-off. This first pic shows how I make the plank patterns. It's not the garboard, but a later plank. All the patterns were generated in the same way, from bristol board. I use cardboard on the full size boats.


It's very important that the pattern board lay naturally flat, without any "edge set". If it is forced up or down in any way, the resulting plank won't be accurate.


On a full size boat, I crawl up underneath to mark the pattern. On the model, I just flip it over. I usually just mark what will be the upper edge of the plank, tracing around the ribbands in this case, or if there are no ribbands, marking the plank the plank location on each mold. This pic shows me marking the other edge, to which I will add the lap width. Typically, just the upper edge of the plank is marked, then the pattern is removed and plank widths measured on the boat then laid off from the upper edge. That is more accurate than using the lower ribband. There was a reason I marked the lower ribband here, but I don't remember what it was. The pattern is cut out with a knife, the fitted back on the boat to check things. If any adjustments need to be made, these are noted on the pattern. I lay the pattern on my plank stock, then mark a series of short lines with a pencil around the pattern. I re-fair the plank with a spline, hitting most of the marks. A fair plank is more important than duplicating the pattern. The knife cut is pretty sloppy. I then cut the plank out on the bandsaw, and fair it up with block plane and spokeshave.



Back to the line-off. The garboard is glued on, and trimmed flush at the stems. I then line off the rest of the planks with little battens. The girths are measured again, and marks put on each mold and at the stems. I add width to the sheer plank (the top most plank) to account for width that will be covered by the gunwale. It will appear narrower than the rest otherwise.


I cut little notches in the molds with my detail chisels, and glued the ribbands in place, beveling the ends to land just short of the stems. Sometimes I had to enlarge the notches if the ribband did not lay in a fair curve.



Next installment, we'll look at lap bevels and gains. Happy Holidays!
Cricket
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 12-30-2013, 05:31 PM
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Default Re: Planked Half Model

I showed a little of this in the dory model, but here it is again. In a lapstrake boat, each plank overlaps the one below it by a set amount, 3/4" in this case, or 3/32" to scale. The plank land has to be beveled so the next plank lays flat all the way around the boat. That bevel changes, or winds, as the shape changes from section to section. I made up a little lap gauge to mark consistent distances.



There's a little trick I used on this model, wrapping a little tape over the edge of my chisel, and running that along the next ribband below to cut the bevel.



Gains must be cut in the ends, so the plank lays flush at the very ends of the boat. This pic is from the previous model dory, but is the same for the peapod.



When the bevels and gains are done and everything fits, the plank is glued on. I start amidship, and glue towards the ends, applying a bead of cyanoacrylate to the land, working a section at a time. I hold the planks with my fingers until I reach the ends, then use clamps.





More later...
Cricket
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