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Old 07-24-2013, 03:59 PM
derekcohen's Avatar
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Default Kist

I recently completed a kist (or blanket chest). The carcase wood is Curly Marri, with Jarrah for the base. The Curly Marri was extraordinarily difficult to work with hand tools, which were used for 90% of this build.





One of the features of this kist is my continuing interest in secret drawers ...





The drawer has 1 1/4" (30mm) of internal depth. This should be plenty for a thick book or several magazines.



Here is a link to the full build on my website ...

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/Kist.html

Regards from Perth

Derek
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Old 07-24-2013, 05:59 PM
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Default Re: Kist

The wood figure is fantastic. Do any of those surfaces twist/ripple/buckle with changes of humidity?

Since my bloodwood tragedy (split of resawn board with humidity change), I've been focusing on South American Mahogany whenever possible.

Charles
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Tools I Have Made: 3 Mallets, Layout Knife, a 1/8 inch Skew Chisel, a 1/4 inch Skew Chisel, Miter Box, 1/8 inch chisel, 3/32 inch chisel (from 3/32 Champion punch), Tool Cabinet
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Old 07-25-2013, 12:25 AM
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Default Re: Kist

Hi Charles

The wood is dry and there is little humidity in Perth. I do not expect much, if any, movement. Much attention was given to allowing for changes in temperature. Hopefully this will pay off.

I read about your experience. Most unfortunate. Any reason you can think of?

Regards from Perth

Derek
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Old 07-25-2013, 02:52 AM
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Default Re: Kist

Nice work Derek. You must have been seeing those dovetails in your sleep though.

Always look forward to your posts.
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Old 07-25-2013, 02:54 AM
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Default Re: Kist

Quote:
Originally Posted by derekcohen View Post
Hi Charles
I read about your experience. Most unfortunate. Any reason you can think of?

N.A. Durso Woodworking | North Hero, VT 05474

Regards from Perth

Derek
I was suckered into using bloodwood due to the fact that its ratio of tangential and longitudinal moisture coefficients is very close to that of mahogany. I expected similar performance to mahogany. I had a 6/4 board and resawed it into three boards, each one quarter inch thick and one board that was one eighth inch thick. One of the quarter inch thick boards exhibited the twisting problem and was the one that split. I remember seeing posts that attributed this to areas in the board that accumulated stress during growth for one reason or another.

The following was a message posted on lumberjocks:



Bloodwood.. another of my favs.. I LOVE the way it smells while working it.

Okay: bloodwood is a relatively new species, given the evolutionary history of trees. It does not produce oils like most other tropical woods as it is not a wet soil growing species.. it is an acidic soil dweller. In the forest succession.. it is a “nurse” tree and in the same family as mulberry trees, but can become monodominant and crowd out shade intolerant species. It seems to be a tree that is switching from utilizing vascular tracheid cells in favor of forming short vessels and lots of axial Parenchyma cells which spread out like wings and then interlock to form a open mesh of cells …. supported by thick walled and elongated fibers. It does allow for crystal growth within their parenchyma cells, which is why it also dulls tools. What this means is that the wood is very brittle and heavy and prone to checking and twisting during the drying process. Thus I agree the wood was improperly dried. Most bloodwood is farmed and licensed harvested, because the species is easily climate affected and several endangered monkey species (e.g. Brown Titi) live off this tree … eating it’s leaves, bark and fruit.

The dye from the wood is not dangerous.. BUT inhaling the wood dust is very very bad for MEN’s reproductive organs. The wood is filled with active palodesangrens agents… that bind to the DHT receptor sending more testosterone into the arms of aromatase, leading to an increase in estrogen and effectively causing temporary impotence and sterilization. Use caution if you are a family man.

As for working it. I have had a board twist only once, i put it down for almost year and all the movement was out and it was fine from them on. As for veneers glue can easily squeeze through the open cells, so I had to use an epoxy.. west system because it blends well with varnish coats… DO NOT use alcohol as it will stain the wood darker permanently… acetone will make the fibers way to soft and easily dissolve any glue you might have used prior… causing bubbles and splits. I may never use bloodwood veneer again.. what a complete PITA. but it looks so awesome! This is my Lily flower table

Mostly I just carve and turn bloodwood or use it for accents and details. BUT more importantly… where did you get 1” thick stock? I have been asking for it everywhere and searching every website and all I can find is 4/4 (roughly 13/16”). I have been told it is how they mill it before shipping out of central America.

-- ~ Eric P Jorgenson: Jorgenson Design


I can add that the smell of cutting bloodwood he loves so much reminded me of a horse barn. In addition, it was a lot of work to clean my cutters after working with bloodwood. Table saw blades and bandsaw blades were caked with resin as was sandpaper. The resulting piece is truly gorgeous and is sitting on my lap, holding my iPad as I compose this reply. However, there definitely is a price to pay when you work with bloodwood that goes well beyond the initial cost of the wood.

Mahogany, on the other hand, cuts like a dream, doesn't cake onto blades or sandpaper, and is notorious for its stability. It looks pretty good, too. But, not gorgeous.

Charles
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Tools I Have Made: 3 Mallets, Layout Knife, a 1/8 inch Skew Chisel, a 1/4 inch Skew Chisel, Miter Box, 1/8 inch chisel, 3/32 inch chisel (from 3/32 Champion punch), Tool Cabinet
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Old 07-26-2013, 03:24 AM
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Default Re: Kist

Looks beautiful Derek
Those dovetails must have been a pain in that difficult wood?
The chisel of choice was lee valley's new steel, or the old koyamaichi faithful?
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Old 07-26-2013, 02:10 PM
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Default Re: Kist

Okami, the opportunity arose during the chiseling of the dovetails to test out four steels: PM-V11, O1, A2 and White Steel.

The results are here:

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolRev...sCompared.html

Regards from Perth

Derek
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