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Old 05-22-2013, 02:17 AM
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Default WIP...Embroidery box (smaller than the big ones)

I'm doing this for the "Woodwork Forums" and thought maybe you guys would like to see it as well'

So this is the story of the construction of an embroidery box. It's pretty simple, but the choice of timber and the finish along with the hinges and handles are what make the box special.
I buy the timber in 200 x 38mm where possible. This gives me enough timber to resaw and thus keep the grain as close as possible in each panel. Two hundred mm gives flexibility in sizing. A box 500mm long x 300mm wide looks totally wrong with a height of 100 or even 160mm. So effectively, I can get away with a metre of wood at max. Makes it easier to find "special" bits of wood. I like to use all Native timber in construction where possible, but sometimes something just looks right and I use it. A lot of making these is feel and sight.

Pic 1 shows some 200 x 38 mm Jarrah that I bought because it has nice striations along its length. I bought two metres for $84.00. This will easily make two boxes at 460-500 mm length. The height will be 185 -200 and the width 240-300 mm.

Pic 2 Shows the resawing. I make the sides 16 mm thick, which gives adequate space for mounting good quality quadrant hinges.

Pic 3 Shows the boards sawn, squared and planed ready for work. I use a Festool TS75 to cut the first side when squaring, then a Makita table saw to trim the other side. Works beautifully. The boards all look comfortably straight when adjacent to each other.

Pics 4 and 5. are of the boards having the internal tray rest grooves routed. I use an 8 mm spiral upcut on an 8mm shank to cut these. I use shallow increments, as too much removal at one time encourages the bit to move upward in the router, resulting in a hole right through the timber!! (This hole can be covered up by making an external inlay over the hole and along the sides)

Pic 6 shows the boards routed and mitred and ready for the QLD Maple inlay and tray supports.

Regards,

Rob
Attached Thumbnails
wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-raw_jarrah_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-resaw_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-squared_boards_3.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-routing_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-routing_2.jpg  

wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-grooved_boards_2.jpg  
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Old 05-22-2013, 04:35 PM
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Default Re: WIP...Embroidery box (smaller than the big ones)

Thanks for the pictures and detailed descriptions - that contribution to the forum takes substantial effort on your part - very beautiful and instructive.
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Old 05-24-2013, 02:55 AM
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Default Re: WIP...Embroidery box (smaller than the big ones)

Now that I have prepared the inside panels of the sides, I need to make a base board and cover it prior to mounting and side glue-up.
The base is made from 6mm Ply wood and is covered with self adhesive baize (velvet sorta) I find the self adhesive stuff to be good quality, easy to use and fairly easy to get. Carrolls have good German stuff available at reasonable cost. There are other suppliers as well, but some of the baize on the market is pretty ordinary.

Pics 1 and 2 show the process of preparing and mounting the baize onto the base. I have previously dry fitted the box and then measured the internal size, then added the depth of the grooves for the base onto that, to give a size for the base. So if the inside of the box measures 200 mm wide and the grooves for the base are each 6 mm deep, then the base will need to be 210 mm wide. Same applies to the length. (This will give room for expansion.)

The next job is to sand and finish the insides of the box. I treat the inside just the same as I do the outside. Finish IS everything!!

I sand the Jarrah back from 80 grit through to 400 grit using a ROS. Typically this means; 80,100,120,150,180,240 and 400g. I sand using an up and back motion, 10 times for each sanding section. The wood will be smoooth!
I use either Wattyl Teak (Scandinavian) Oil or Organoil Hard Burnishing Oil usually, though Pure Tung Oil (either straight or diluted 1:1/1:2 with White Spirit will work fine as well. Make sure it is Pure Tung Oil, such as made by Liberon.

The oil is allowed to soak into the timber for 15-30 minutes. During this time, you should't need to touch the work. A good application of oil in the first place should see the surface still wet after the incubation. Add another coat of oil, then begin wet sanding with the same 400 grit pad you've just used dry. Then go up through the grits, (using the same 10 up and down strokes as used with the dry sanding), 500,800,1200,1500,2000 and 4000g The 2 and 4k pads are available from a few auto sanding suppliers and also from The Sandpaper man and Festool. The Festool pads are about $4.00 each, but they can be washed and reused.
After a brisk rub down with a soft cotton cloth, the box sides are finished. They should show a nice rich grain with a soft satin finish, until you look along the workpiece, in which case you will see a mirror like reflection of your surroundings. That is all you need to do!! No further finishing is necessary. If you feel that 2000 is more than adequate, then stop there, but I can guarantee you that the 4k is worth it.
Pics 3 to 56 show the process I have outlined. If you run into difficulties or the finish doesn't look right, send me a PM and I'll work through it with you.
Next we can add the support rails and inlay.

To make the inlay and supports, I cut a piece of timber (in this case QLD Maple) to a 12 mm square piece. I then use a planer to take the pieces down to 6 mm x 8 mm for the inlay (6 mm groove depth) and 8 mm by 12 mm for the support rails.

Pic 7 shows the four pieces ready to be glued in place. I set the long rails to the internal length of the box (dry assembled) and the length of the inlay to the internal width of the box plus the depth of the grooves on each side. So if the box was 300 long as an internal measurement then that would be the length of the support rails. Similarly if the box was 200 wide internal and the grooves were 6 mm deep, the length of the inlay would be 212 mm

Regards,

Rob
Attached Thumbnails
wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-base_on_baize_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-base_ready_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-sanding_pre_oil_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-sanding_pre_oil_2.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-oiled_wood_1.jpg  

wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-oil_finish_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-maple_rails_1.jpg  
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Old 05-28-2013, 11:15 PM
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Default Re: WIP...Embroidery box (smaller than the big ones)

Hi all,
I'm sorry for the delay in posting updates, but every time I sat down to write, something else came up. So, you're gonna get the whole lot now, over two posts (maybe three).

Next step is to place the tray supports and inlay in place. They can be oiled after they are mounted, so it's just a case of glue them in place, ensuring that you have got the ends set to the right place. This is important as when you close the sides together, if the supports are not where they should be, the ends won't meet!
Pics 1 and 2 show the QLD Maple inlay and supports in place.

Now it's time to fit the box carcass together. I find it useful to use tape to hold the sides together while I'm gluing up and clamping. This gives some support and prevents the whole thing from collapsing like a deck of cards during the glue up process. I use corner clamps to aid in keeping the box square, standard clamps to keep the sides in place and a box clamp to hold the whole thing together is some kind of order.
Pics 3 and 4 Show the box clamped. Pic 4 gives a view of the inside of the box during glue up. Note that the rails cover nicely the inlays and that the corners are square.

After gluing, the box is left for 12 hours+ to dry thoroughly. After that, it is time to sand and oil the outside of the carcass. The oiling and sanding is exactly as I described for the interior of the box.
Pics 5 and 6 show the finished oiled exterior of the box sanded and oiled. The procedure is exactly the same as for the interior. Pic 6 shows the finish from an angle. the reflection is of the window in my shed!

Regards,

Rob
Attached Thumbnails
wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-box-inside_rail_oil_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-box-inside_rail_oil_2.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-box_clamped_2.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-box_clamped_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-box_outside_oiled_1.jpg  

wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-box_outside_oiled_2.jpg  
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Old 05-28-2013, 11:26 PM
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Default Re: WIP...Embroidery box (smaller than the big ones)

It's now time to start on the lid and then the tray. For the lid I am going to use figured Red Gum as the frame and Black Heart Sassafrass (book matched) as the centre panel.
The Red Gum has a groove cut for the Sassy to fit into. This was cut using a 6 mm Slot Cutter and the depth of cut was set at 10 mm.
From memory, the rails themselves were 42-45 mm wide and 16 mm deep. Corners are mitred.
Pics 1 and 2 show the Red Gum frame dry fitted and the book matched Sassy panel. The Sassafrass was resawn on a generic 17" Band Saw using a 1" 3TPI blade, then thicknessed on a generic 13" planer.
Once the centre panel is dry it is ready for sanding and oiling. Again the procedure is exactly as before.
Pic 3 shows the oiled book matched panel.
The lid assembly is now glued together and the Red Gum sanded and oiled (as before
Pic 4 shows the assembled finished lid.

Next is the tray. I have selected a nice piece of Recycled Tassie Blackwood for the tray. (So by now you think it's a hodgepodge of different timbers, but wait till the end and see how they fit together).
The tray's sides are cut to 55 mm, which gives a gap of about 8 mm between it and the top. A slot was cut using a 6 mm slot cutter to a depth of 4 mm. The sides themselves are 8 mm wide. Corners are mitred, though I could have gone for 1/8 or 1/16" finger joints. I find these a little "busy" on small boards.
Pic 5, 6, 7 and 8, show the process of assembling the tray.

Last is the Hinges. Normally I would use Quadrant hinges, but today I decided to use the last 95 degree stop hinge and use two butt hinges as well. In retrospect, I think I would have put the butt hinges further out on the back.
I use two chisels for making the rebates for the hinges. A 1" to mark the edges of the rebate and a Lie Nielson 5/16" chisel for paring. The 5/16 is perfect for quad hinges and fits the area for a standard 25 mm butt hinge very well also.

Pics 9, and 10 show the hinges being mounted.

Regards,

Rob
Attached Thumbnails
wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-lid_frame_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-bhs_pre_oil_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-lid_panel_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-finished_lid_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-mitres_cut_1.jpg  

wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-slots_cut_tray_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-tray_glued_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-tray_finis_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-hinges_rebate_2.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-hinges_1.jpg  

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Old 05-28-2013, 11:28 PM
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Default Re: WIP...Embroidery box (smaller than the big ones)

And...That's it! One Embroidery Box made in the shade. Obviously you can alter any or all aspects of this build. I wish you all success. They are great fun to build!
Attached Thumbnails
wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-finis_1.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-finis_2.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-finis_3.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-finis_4.jpg   wip-embroidery-box-smaller-than-big-finis_5.jpg  

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