talkFestool  

Go Back   talkFestool > Projects, Methods, and Techniques > Woodworking Projects

Woodworking Projects Chairs to chests, boxes to breadboards? Stop in!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 11-28-2011, 12:06 AM
Cricket's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard
Posts: 222
Default Matinicus Island double ender.

Hi there folks,
I thought I would post a few highlights from my current boat building project. The whole thing is documented on my blog and you can click back to the beginning at the top of the post. There's a bit of the history of the type, and a few examples of other boats at Part 1.
I've just started back to work on the boat this thanksgiving weekend.

This is the sail plan- a yawl rig (not traditional with the type).


And this is the deck plan. I'm working on the interior at this point, and hope to be decking soon. But going back a ways, here is the hull just off of the strongback, molds still attached.




Gluing in the inwales (sheer clamps).


Laying out the deck curve.


The interior is primed and sanded.


And finish painted.


The floorboards are in, and oiled (old redwood picnic table scavenge).


The thwarts are in, but not fastened yet. I'm fitting the side benches now.


Closeup of a thwart knee, in cherry.

Thanks for letting me bore you all with this!
Cricket
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 11-28-2011, 12:15 AM
TahoeTwoBears's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: South Lake Tahoe, CA - Minden, NV
Posts: 1,365
Send a message via ICQ to TahoeTwoBears
Default Re: Matinicus Island double ender.

Bore away. It's fascintating! I'm liking it.

Mike
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 11-28-2011, 12:24 AM
joraft's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: San Fernando Valley (SoCal)
Posts: 6,575
Default Re: Matinicus Island double ender.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cricket View Post

... Thanks for letting me bore you all with this!
Boring? I'm thinking fascinating! Thank you!

.
__________________
John
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 11-28-2011, 12:24 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: New England
Posts: 228
Default Re: Matinicus Island double ender.

Love it! Great work. Looking forward to the updates.

Was thinking of a build myself. Something along these lines.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 11-28-2011, 12:34 AM
Cricket's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard
Posts: 222
Default Re: Matinicus Island double ender.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigfoot View Post
Was thinking of a build myself. Something along these lines.
I like the Nexus boats. At some point in the not too distant future, I need to build a new power boat to replace the little Boston Whaler we use at my club to run races. The 21' dory, sans cabin, is one of the contenders.
Cricket
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 11-28-2011, 02:46 AM
Poto's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 8,958
Default Re: Matinicus Island double ender.

What fun, Cricket! Thanks for posting - keep up the boring.

What's the thickness of the hull? How do you figure out the curves of each piece? What's the joinery?

Hmmm - maybe I should read the blog...
__________________
I don't have as many Festools as Fred. Or Marcou's, or Brese's, or Lie-Nielsen's, or Lee Valley's, or Blue Spruce's, or Harold and Saxon's, or...
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 11-28-2011, 03:07 AM
Cricket's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard
Posts: 222
Default Re: Matinicus Island double ender.

Hi Poto,
Most of it is in the blog, but the hull is 3/8" occume (gaboon). The planks are lined out on the molds with temporary ribbands, by a combination of math (hull girths at a given station) and by eye. The true expanded shapes are found by spiling, bending a spiling board around the hull and picking up dimensions (several ways to do this).

Thanks for the interest!
Cricket
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 11-28-2011, 05:09 AM
Poto's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 8,958
Default Re: Matinicus Island double ender.

I'm sorry, Cricket, but you can't just use terms like "spiling" (with only one "l") and not tell us what they mean. Come on. Spill.

(And, yes, I'm too lazy to go and look it up. That's why we have forums: it saves me doing my own research.)

__________________
I don't have as many Festools as Fred. Or Marcou's, or Brese's, or Lie-Nielsen's, or Lee Valley's, or Blue Spruce's, or Harold and Saxon's, or...
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 11-28-2011, 06:33 AM
AkTom's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Soldotna, Alaska
Posts: 380
Default Re: Matinicus Island double ender.

I love wooden boats. Pics are always appreciated. Great use of the picnic table.
Tom
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 11-28-2011, 06:19 PM
Cricket's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard
Posts: 222
Default Re: Matinicus Island double ender.

Its a little hard to explain spiling without illustrations, but basically its a way of finding a true plank shape, or bulkhead or whatever. For planking, a spiling batten that is a little narrower than the plank itself is temporarily tacked around the molds. It is usually in 2 or more pieces, to address the shape as it bends around the boat. There are several ways to plot the shape, one of which involves swinging compass arcs from the final landing place of both edges of the plank, at each mold. When the spiling batten is placed on the plank stock, the arcs are swung in reverse, marking the points on the plank. The compass has to swing the same arc at each mold.

My method is sometimes described as "range and bearing". I hang the spiling batten same as before, but I use a steel rule or a try square blade and mark a line across the batten at each mold, then holding the end of the rule on the target location, I mark the batten at some convenient point on the rule, say at 1". I reverse the process on the actual plank, same as with the compass method, then run a long batten through each point and draw a line connecting the dots. That is the plank edge. I often spile only one edge, then measure the plank widths at each mold and lay out the other edge that way.Its a little like scribing a counter template to a wall with a series of points exactly one inch away at known intervals, rather than running a scribe leg all along the wall.


This is how the planks are lined off, or how wide they are at each mold. This does not illustrate spiling. I don't have any pics of that process, unfortunately.


On this boat, I spiled the first few planks as just described, but then I started using cardboard strips, hot glued together and overhanging the target widths. I then marked the plank's upper edge (lower edge on the setup because the boat is upside down) from underneath at the point marked on each mold. I measured the plank widths, sprang the batten around both sets of points on the cardboard pattern, and used this to cut a slightly oversize plank. I then hung the real plank on the boat, and marked the exact shape directly from the boat. This proved easier, and ultimately faster than the spiling method.


This is the cardboard pattern I used on the latter few planks.

It is surprising how the planks are actually shaped. The garboards (lowermost planks) have a slight "s" curve, and the straightest planks are just above the turn of the bilge. Different boats have different plank shapes, and the shapes change depending on their location on the boat, and to some extent how the planks were lined off in the first place. Lapstrake planking in particular is a blend of science and art.

Well, this long-winded treatise has probably served to thoroughly obfuscate the process. I learned it all from books, and trial and error.
Cricket
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:18 PM.