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Old 07-02-2011, 01:26 AM
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Default The Anarchist's Tool Chest

I just got a copy of Chris Schwarz's new book The Anarchist's Tool Chest. I'm still in the leafing through it to see what's in there stage but I've got to say it's his best book yet. He does a nice job of covering virtually all hand tools with tips on use. Probably the very, very best thing about this book is that he hardly even mentions the "work bench"!
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Old 07-02-2011, 05:49 AM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

Ben Lowery @blowery, whom I follow on Twitter, compiled this list of Schwarz's essential tools. It would be interesting to know how we each score. +1 for each tool you have on the list, -1 for each tool you have that isn't on the list. I predict an average of (-120)

Handplanes
Jack plane
Plow plane
Rabbet/shoulder plane
Router plane
Block plane

Marking & Measuring
Cutting gauge(s)
Panel gauge
6″ Combination square
6″ Rule
24″ folding rule or 24″ steel rule
12″ tape measure
Marking knife
Wooden winding Sticks
36″ wooden straightedge
Wooden try square, 12″ blade
Sliding bevel
Dividers, two to four pair
Trammel points

Essential Cutting Tools
Bevel-edge chisels 1/8″, 1/4″, 3/8″, 1/2″, 3/4″ and 1-1/4″
Mortise chisels, 1/4″ or 5/16″
Spokeshave
Cabinet, modeling and rattail rasp
Card scrapers

Striking & Fastening Tools
Chisel mallet
Cross-peen hammer
13 oz. to 16 oz. claw hammer
Deadblow mallet
Nailsets
Nail pincers
Set of slotted screwdrivers
Screw tips for drill/drivers
Sawnut drivers
Countersinks & counterbores
10″ brace
Hand drill
Set of 13 auger bits
Brad points 1/8″, 3/16″, 1/4″, 5/16″, 3/8″, 7/16″ and 1/2″
Birdcage awl
Dowel plate
Saws
Dovetail saw
Carcase saw
Tenon saw
Panel saws (rip saw, crosscut saw, fine crosscut saw)
Flush cut saw
Coping saw

Sharpening
Sharpening stones (honing and polishing)
Strop
Grinder
Oilcan or plant mister
Burnisher

Appliances
Bench hook
Sawbenches
Miter box
End-grain shooting board
Long-grain shooting board
Cork-backed sanding block
Workbench

Good-to-have Tools
Dial caliper
12″ combination square
Dovetail marker
Jointer plane
Smooth plane
Large shoulder plane
Carpenter’s hatchet
Drawknife
No. 80 cabinet scraper
Beading plane
Small complex moulder, such as an ogee or square ovolo
Half-set of hollows & rounds
1-1/2″-wide paring chisel
Fishtail chisel
Drawer-lock chisel
Mortise float
Expansive bit
Drawbore pins
12″ bowsaw
Sawfiles
Mill file
Saw Vise
Saw Set
Side-clamp honing guide
__________________
Magic Square - for when "close enough" is good enough.
Chris Wong, Flair Woodworks

Last edited by FlairWoodworks; 07-02-2011 at 06:00 AM. Reason: Edited to add (5) spaces to the end of each line to make it easier for you to insert your counts.
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Old 07-02-2011, 05:55 AM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

This will take some time but it should be fun -- Thanks!
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Old 07-02-2011, 05:57 AM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

So I clicked "Quote", then removed the quote html tags and counted the tools I have - the numbers are at the ends of the item descriptions. 54 to the good. Now for the negatives...

Handplanes
Jack plane 1
Plow plane
Rabbet/shoulder plane 2
Router plane 3
Block plane 4

Marking & Measuring
Cutting gauge(s) 5
Panel gauge
6″ Combination square 6
6″ Rule 7
24″ folding rule or 24″ steel rule 8
12″ tape measure 9
Marking knife 10
Wooden winding Sticks 11
36″ wooden straightedge 12
Wooden try square, 12″ blade
Sliding bevel 13
Dividers, two to four pair 14
Trammel points

Essential Cutting Tools
Bevel-edge chisels 1/8″, 1/4″, 3/8″, 1/2″, 3/4″ and 1-1/4″ 15
Mortise chisels, 1/4″ or 5/16″ 16
Spokeshave 17
Cabinet, modeling and rattail rasp 18
Card scrapers 19

Striking & Fastening Tools
Chisel mallet 20
Cross-peen hammer 21
13 oz. to 16 oz. claw hammer 22
Deadblow mallet 23
Nailsets 24
Nail pincers 25
Set of slotted screwdrivers 26
Screw tips for drill/drivers 27
Sawnut drivers
Countersinks & counterbores 28
10″ brace 29
Hand drill 30
Set of 13 auger bits
Brad points 1/8″, 3/16″, 1/4″, 5/16″, 3/8″, 7/16″ and 1/2″ 31
Birdcage awl
Dowel plate
Saws
Dovetail saw 32
Carcase saw
Tenon saw
Panel saws (rip saw, crosscut saw, fine crosscut saw) 33
Flush cut saw 34
Coping saw 35

Sharpening
Sharpening stones (honing and polishing) 36
Strop 37
Grinder 38
Oilcan or plant mister
Burnisher 39

Appliances
Bench hook
Sawbenches
Miter box
End-grain shooting board 40
Long-grain shooting board 41
Cork-backed sanding block 42
Workbench 43

Good-to-have Tools
Dial caliper
12″ combination square 44
Dovetail marker 45
Jointer plane
Smooth plane 46
Large shoulder plane
Carpenter’s hatchet
Drawknife 47
No. 80 cabinet scraper 48
Beading plane
Small complex moulder, such as an ogee or square ovolo
Half-set of hollows & rounds
1-1/2″-wide paring chisel 49
Fishtail chisel
Drawer-lock chisel
Mortise float
Expansive bit
Drawbore pins
12″ bowsaw
Sawfiles 50
Mill file 51
Saw Vise 52
Saw Set 53
Side-clamp honing guide 54
__________________
Magic Square - for when "close enough" is good enough.
Chris Wong, Flair Woodworks
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Old 07-02-2011, 04:08 PM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

I started gathering up woodworking stuff (tools, equipment, and info) over thirty years ago. For the first several years I went to yard sales religiously. Back then guys who had actually made a living using hand tools were unloading stuff (rather than their heirs) so I was often able to gather their insight as well as tools. As a consequence I have most of the stuff on this list.

The first thing I lack is the dowel plate. Never had any trouble buying dowels so far.

I don't have any true shooting boards.

Only have a couple of hollows & rounds.

Don't have a 12″ bowsaw, intend to make one some day.

Not real sure what the following are so I might/might not have them
Drawer-lock chisel
Mortise float
Side-clamp honing guide
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Old 07-02-2011, 04:44 PM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelKellough View Post
I started gathering up woodworking stuff (tools, equipment, and info) over thirty years ago. For the first several years I went to yard sales religiously. Back then guys who had actually made a living using hand tools were unloading stuff (rather than their heirs) so I was often able to gather their insight as well as tools. As a consequence I have most of the stuff on this list.

The first thing I lack is the dowel plate. Never had any trouble buying dowels so far.

I don't have any true shooting boards.

Only have a couple of hollows & rounds.

Don't have a 12″ bowsaw, intend to make one some day.

Not real sure what the following are so I might/might not have them
Drawer-lock chisel
Mortise float
Side-clamp honing guide
That is how cabinet & furniture making evolved (or so I read). If it has a power cord it is better and if it didn't unload it. Since I don't earn money with tools I have a limited view of it all. The hand tool affectionados cite many examples where hand tools are actually faster but again that is to be determined by craftsmen like Brice. I think he has said he has only one plane and there are no more in his future. As an amateur woodworker (no time pressure) I really enjoy the quiet, dust free relaxed pace of hand tools.

I have a side clamp honing guide (and about every other style of honing guide ). LN sells both mortise floats (basically a flat rasp) and drawer lock chisels (they have a youtube demo on using one).

I want to get some "quiet time" this weekend to enter my +/- score of tools possessed here.
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Old 07-02-2011, 05:13 PM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

There's a difference between woodworkers that use hand tools and those that use only power tools. I'm confident in saying that most furniture makers use hand tools a lot in their work, and frankly couldn't be without them. Probably every piece they make has had some hand tool work. Most woodworkers that have had some formal training would have been taught to use and maintain hand tools before they ever touched a power tool.
Then there's the big mass produced set ups, where everything is doweled together and machined. Most of the people in the factory wouldn't know how to hold a hand plane.
Then there's the contractor types. These days most of them rely on power tools to make a living. They can't make money playing around with hand tools... Some of the younger contractors these days haven't a clue about using hand tools, unless they were an apprentice to an old dinosaur

Last edited by Okami; 07-03-2011 at 04:22 AM.
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Old 07-02-2011, 05:18 PM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

If you're making one small cabinet, like Trevor's key cabinet, and have the appropriate hands tools in fine fettle, you could make that cabinet quicker than if you have to set up and adjust machines. But, you know the rest of the story...

I don't know if wood was actually cheaper back in the days of hand tools (relative to everything else) but I do know it was better quality. I don't have the luxury of selecting the appropriate straight grained stock that lends itself to moulding edges with hand tools. With the wood available today I get better results (less tear-out) with rapidly spinning cutters. I'm not trying to dissuade anyone from working with hand tools but that's why I don't use mine much.
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Old 07-02-2011, 05:35 PM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

This article at This is Carpentry on Carving a Volute is very interesting and the guys use a mix of hand and power tools along with a hell of a lot of knowledge and skill to make something very complex.

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Old 07-02-2011, 06:29 PM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

I agree with Okami that most woodworkers use a combination of hand tools and power tools. Machinery is best for the labourious work such as breaking down and jointing/planing stock. Also for repetitive work reproducing shapes and sizes.

I'll stick my neck out a little and say that those who put together cabinet parts are really assemblers, not woodworkers.
__________________
Magic Square - for when "close enough" is good enough.
Chris Wong, Flair Woodworks
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