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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 07-03-2011, 08:59 PM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

Quote:
Originally Posted by FredWest View Post
Ron,

Here is a part of the article that I was referring to.

Fred

Commercial volutes

Even commercial handrail systems — available from local lumberyards — include volutes. They are always the most expensive parts in the catalogue. High-end stair part companies offer handsome volutes and attractive stairs can be built with them. But for the most part, manufactured volutes have a few failings:
  • They aren’t available in a wide range of species
  • They aren’t available in a wide range of patterns.
  • Available patterns are not for the most part historically correct.
Machine-made volutes are primarily designed for just that — to be made on automatic or semi-automatic machinery. The curves are kept open so that rotating cutters can reach into every curve, which means the rail never spirals in on a center — they have no eye…exactly, they have no vision, they fail to provide a natural and necessary visual termination and starting place for railing.
A commercial volute with an ‘upeasing’ (right) must be installed higher above the starting step than a volute with a wreath (left).

In addition, for ease of construction, commercial volutes curve in elevation, and then curve in plan — they have no compound curves, which means they remain level until the second tread and must be set high on every stair. For that reason, commercial volutes require long balusters and tall newels; a person starting up such a stair must raise their hand uncomfortably high. (See Fig. 5)
I see. The issue isn't that CNC machines aren't capable of the beauty on the left model, someone made decisions to cut some corners, reduce costs, increase profits. All companies have a profit motive however time and again decisions are made in the interest of near term profit & bonus -- Stanley tools are a good example although they are making an effort to change direction.
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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 07-07-2011, 02:35 AM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

Hmmm... it's just possible I could actually WIN this game....

I mean, considering how few tools I own overall, it's maybe not as much of a long shot as one might think.

(and... um... attentive readers may note that my "Loot" thread needs updating....)

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlairWoodworks View Post
Ben Lowery @blowery, whom I follow on Twitter, compiled this list of Schwarz's essential tools. It would be interesting to know how we each score. +1 for each tool you have on the list, -1 for each tool you have that isn't on the list. I predict an average of (-120)

Handplanes
Jack plane 1
Plow plane 2
Rabbet/shoulder plane my tiny Veritas one doesn't count, right?
Router plane 3
Block plane 4

Marking & Measuring
Cutting gauge(s) 5
Panel gauge X
6″ Combination square 6
6″ Rule 7
24″ folding rule or 24″ steel rule 8
12″ tape measure 9 (assuming we mean feet, not inches)
Marking knife 10
Wooden winding Sticks X
36″ wooden straightedge X
Wooden try square, 12″ blade X... unless we multiply the 3" engineers square by the 4" one...
Sliding bevel 11
Dividers, two to four pair 12
Trammel points X

Essential Cutting Tools
Bevel-edge chisels 1/8″, 1/4″, 3/8″, 1/2″, 3/4″ and 1-1/4″ 13
Mortise chisels, 1/4″ or 5/16″ 14
Spokeshave X
Cabinet, modeling and rattail rasp but 2 out of 3 ain't bad....
Card scrapers 15

Striking & Fastening Tools
Chisel mallet 16
Cross-peen hammer X
13 oz. to 16 oz. claw hammer 17
Deadblow mallet 18
Nailsets 19
Nail pincers X
Set of slotted screwdrivers 20
Screw tips for drill/drivers 21
Sawnut drivers X
Countersinks & counterbores X
10″ brace 22
Hand drill X
Set of 13 auger bits X
Brad points 1/8″, 3/16″, 1/4″, 5/16″, 3/8″, 7/16″ and 1/2″ 23
Birdcage awl X
Dowel plate X

Saws
Dovetail saw 24
Carcase saw X
Tenon saw 25
Panel saws (rip saw, crosscut saw, fine crosscut saw) 26
Flush cut saw 27
Coping saw 28

Sharpening
Sharpening stones (honing and polishing) 29
Strop 30
Grinder X
Oilcan or plant mister 31
Burnisher 32

Appliances
Bench hook X
Sawbenches X
Miter box 33
End-grain shooting board X
Long-grain shooting board X
Cork-backed sanding block 34
Workbench 35

Good-to-have Tools
Dial caliper X
12″ combination square 36
Dovetail marker X
Jointer plane X
Smooth plane X
Large shoulder plane X
Carpenter’s hatchet X
Drawknife X
No. 80 cabinet scraper 37
Beading plane X
Small complex moulder, such as an ogee or square ovolo X
Half-set of hollows & rounds X
1-1/2″-wide paring chisel X
Fishtail chisel X
Drawer-lock chisel X
Mortise float X
Expansive bit X
Drawbore pins X
12″ bowsaw X
Sawfiles X
Mill file 38
Saw Vise X
Saw Set X
Side-clamp honing guide 39
Okay, that's 39... minus... what?

For starters, we can subtract 3 sanders, 1 guided saw, and 1 cordless drill.
That brings it down to 34.
Heh. The list makes no mention of clamps or holddowns of ANY kind...
... so I'm thinking the VacSys gets a free pass with the Bench Cookies.


What else? Let's see....
-1 for the JointMaker. And what the heck... -1 for my Dremel tool.
That's 32.

Now, like Okami, I also have one of these:



Then there's my alligator "wrench set."

Oh, and I DO have that enormous pile of used dental instruments.

Not to mention my little boxed set of FlexCut carving tools.
(which, come to think of it, I don't believe I HAVE previously mentioned... )

Wait. What was the question again?
I don't think I have the attention span for solving story problems.

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Last edited by hasslefactor; 07-07-2011 at 02:40 AM.
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 07-07-2011, 02:53 AM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

Laurie, you are in the perfect position to be the winner. Many of us have been collecting tools (and negative points) for years where you have a more recent interest.
As I mentioned earlier it's almost strange and frightening how Chris fails to mention work benches / work holding / clamping -- I guess maybe because virtually every sentence he has written for the past number of years has been about those. I do think this is my favorite book of his.
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old 07-07-2011, 03:00 AM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

Quote:
Originally Posted by hasslefactor View Post
Now, like Okami, I also have one of these:



(which, come to think of it, I don't believe I HAVE previously mentioned... )

Wait. What was the question again?
I don't think I have the attention span for solving story problems.

My favorite store (Lee Valley) sells inserts for your Stanley screwdriver that will hold all modern hex style bits so you can drive/remove virtually any fastener and even drill lead holes for hanging pictures, etc.
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old 07-07-2011, 04:37 AM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

Perhaps it's just me, but the now very, very old Stanley that was a part of my childhood - in other words, was my parents so now should be on the order of 60 years old -

I really and truly disliked, so much so that i purposely made sure some sibling got it.

The reason is that that mechanism must, by its design, push into your work as you are trying to extract a screw (etc.). This is counterproductive, and leads to all sorts of colorful vocabulary.

Others' experiences?
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 07-07-2011, 05:20 AM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

You're right, pushing isn't generally conducive to screw extraction, although it does often work with machine screws.

But, you don't have to always use the spiral shaft. It can be locked from turning and the tool works like a very long screwdriver. The spiral shaft can be locked in the retracted position and the tool works like a long screwdriver. In addition, the rotation of the shaft can be set to ratchet either clockwise or counter-clockwise or set to turn not at all.
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  #37 (permalink)  
Old 07-07-2011, 05:21 AM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

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Originally Posted by AlaskaRanger View Post
Perhaps it's just me, but the now very, very old Stanley that was a part of my childhood - in other words, was my parents so now should be on the order of 60 years old -

I really and truly disliked, so much so that i purposely made sure some sibling got it.

The reason is that that mechanism must, by its design, push into your work as you are trying to extract a screw (etc.). This is counterproductive, and leads to all sorts of colorful vocabulary.

Others' experiences?
In theory that is absolutely correct however if the Stanley is lubricated & working smoothly the down-force really isn't much more than is needed anyhow to avoid cam-out of the fastener. The big enemy to my thinking is the slotted screw drive -- they will defy removal (or insertion) by any power means and only succumb to a flat blade screw driver. I may build a church on the torx drive fastener...
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  #38 (permalink)  
Old 07-07-2011, 05:54 AM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

My Dad had a Yankee Screwdriver and a seperate push-drill for starter holes. They were a little awkward to use until you got the hang of it.
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  #39 (permalink)  
Old 07-07-2011, 05:55 AM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

They're not as effective at withdrawing a screw as driving one in, for sure.
The more you use it, the better it works. The guys I watched using them on site when I was a lad, were driving those screws in at a very fast pace it kind of blew me away at the time.
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  #40 (permalink)  
Old 07-07-2011, 06:04 AM
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Default Re: The Anarchist's Tool Chest

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wonderwino View Post
My Dad had a Yankee Screwdriver and a seperate push-drill for starter holes. They were a little awkward to use until you got the hang of it.
Yup. I broke a bit the first time I used one. If I'm using a non-electric drill for small holes, I prefer an egg-beater style drill.
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