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Shops and Storage Talk about your shops and how you organize them

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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 10-31-2014, 07:11 PM
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Default 144 feet of funkin'

Welcome to my shop. It needs help.

When I say 144 feet, I actually mean a bit less. Around 136 feet when you factor in walls. It is also seven feet tall to the rafters/what's left of the ceiling. It has carpenter ant and water damage. It's on a hill, and not level. It has no permanent power, heat or air.

It is, however, mine.

The tour of the shop, clockwise from the entrance: (pics came out a touch bigger than I wanted)



Planer and sander on flip cart, miter saw on cart. Hardwood and some plywood storage on the wall.



The mighty HF bandsaw with some mods. Screw/hardware storage in the bins.



Way too big and bulky jointer, and the DP. Clamp and assorted storage.



Back wall with safety, assorted storage, saws and the lathe.



Hand tool corner with my Holtzapffel-inspired bench.



The window. Check out how awesome the seal and single pane is! Also in there is a vac and huge separator.



A small glimpse of the table saw with old router table, the very corner of the new router table and there are a couple of bins hidden.

All this is current as of August, which basically means it's current now.
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Old 10-31-2014, 07:29 PM
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Default Re: 144 feet of funkin'

It wasn't very apparent, but there was a stack of Tanos systainers on the edge of that last photo. I have a TS55REQ with a 1900 rail, a DF500, and several Tanos sys's to store some things in.

There is quite a bit to fit into this shop, and since I have gotten the lathe (last major purchase, size-wise) it has felt like one too many. I can't see myself getting rid of anything though, and I struggle trying to fit 10 pounds in a 5 pound bag. I have spent way more time over the past couple of years designing my shop than making anything in it, and way less time making anything for outside the shop. I'm well aware I need a new shop, and not trying to fix this one up or keep it going. Reality tells me something different, that other priorities come before building a new 12x16 shop, which even those four more linear feet would be a huge increase.

I want it all, but don't know where to cut to get close. I want repeatable cuts on the miter saw, but I don't want to eat space with wings. The stand for my table saw takes up way too much room, but I don't want to give up the ability to stand it up. I want a freestanding router table but could really use the room otherwise.

It's been awhile since I did any fresh renders of my shop, but I'm getting the urge to get back out there after an exhausting summer. I may just distract myself this weekend by working on that.
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Old 10-31-2014, 08:23 PM
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Default Re: 144 feet of funkin'

Looks like a bigger shop is the next thing you need!

I'm going through the same evolution. I started with a drill press and a pile of tools in the corner of the garage, then it grew to one bay, then both sides of the two car garage and a little stuff in the store room. We ended up buying an old retail building for cheap and have started renovating it. The "Blank Slate" will be the shop in another few $$$$$$$$$$$$$$.
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Old 11-01-2014, 06:19 AM
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Default Re: 144 feet of funkin'

My shop is not a whole lot bigger. Instead of a table saw I use an MFT1080 (actually two) that I can fold up when needed (for instance, when someone wants to park a car in my shop). I haven't found any situations that I need a table saw - I can usually do everything with my ATF55, guide rails, band saw, or router.

The hard part is turning a big piece of furniture around - I have to take it outside!
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Old 11-02-2014, 01:58 AM
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Default Re: 144 feet of funkin'

The table saw came about early in my hobby, and got it for a great deal. I only discovered the benefit of Festools earlier this year. I'd love to have an MFT or two in the shop, and I've investigated the effort to make room for one, or a custom solution. I'll take you through an in-depth tour in the next post so that perhaps I can gain some ideas from you.
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Old 11-02-2014, 01:44 AM
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Default Re: 144 feet of funkin'

The in-depth tour. Linking the pictures this time.

When we bought this house six years ago, there was this shed in the back yard. It had modly carpet and curtains, and 1/4" plywood walls (inside and out) and ceiling, mounted on wood boards that spanned the studs. I found out there was water damage, and a huge infestation of carpenter ants. Mosquitos are an extreme problem in the warm months. I run all my tools off of a pair of extension cords - one usually handles the tool, while the other does the battery charging, vac and, when needed, LED lighting on the ceiling.

I have pulled about 75% of the walls and replaced with 7/16" OSB, and pulled about 66% of the ceiling. Not exactly sure if the ceiling will get replaced or if it will be open. The exterior is starting to rot, and real wood is being eaten by what I assume are carpenter bees. In summer I have a couple of battery operated fans, in winter a couple of corded heaters. With the fans comes the bug spray. With the heaters, gloves. If I could straight-up replace my shop for a thousand dollars, not even gaining power or space, I would probably do it. I would at least gain some insulation.

The machines:


The table saw A Craftsman 21829, an extension of the BT3 series by Ryobi. I added a miter slot and removed the sliding table. I added rail extensions and my old router table surface to cut wide panels. The width doesn't do me a lot of good these days, and I'll be taking it down to the least amount of footprint. The stand allows me to swing it up and wheel it anywhere, but the handles and outrigger take up valuable storage space. Not as deep as a traditional hybrid saw.

The planer and sander Dewalt 735x and Ridgid EB4424. Love both, hate the rotating stand I made for it. While it does a good job making better space, everything falls out when flipped, needing a drawer underneath. Would rather have the planer on a cart, and the sander I can pull out when needed.

The jointer - a Craftsman professional model from the mid-90s. 6.25" capacity. One of the more used tools in the shop, but the footprint is the most problematic for trying to plan around. Extremely deep at the base and the jointing surface, it's also obviously long. Pre-fab mobile base just increases the footprint. Wish I had a more compact model that had the same capacity.

The bandsaw - a Harbor Freight special, souped up with some mods including a Powermatic riser. The tool that is probably the least dialed in, and one I don't get fantastic results from.

The drill press - a Ridgid 14" floor model (literal) from Home Depot. Picked it up when displays were going out of style. Only complaint is the tabs on the base for casters(?) make it take up slightly more room than I wish.

The miter saw - a Hitachi C12RSH that incorporates a dual slider system to make it take up a bit less room than other 12" sliders. Still pretty large, and very heavy. Pretty accurate, though.

The lathe - another HF special, this time a clone of the Jet 1236. One of my more surprising tools, everything is actually really well made. The base is a bit more robust than you's suspect, but will still need replacing with something that is weightier and a bit more dampening.

The router table - offset base of my own design, holding a Triton 3.25HP model under a Kreg plate. Designed it to eventually buy an Incra 17" system. Also have a couple of Craftsman multi-base routers that do handheld work, or can slot in at the table saw.

When I'm considering layouts and storage, I also have a HCM, an entire line-up of Ryobi 18v tools, a dozen or so systainers, a Ridgid vac and a 30 gallon separator. I unfortunately don't have room for a real DC.
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Old 11-06-2014, 04:05 AM
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Default Dust collection



This is what I've come up with, about the best I can reasonable conceive. Ignore the open area to the left/bottom, as I'm using the same building measurements for a potential 12x16 new shop. Under that surface in the right corner is my jointer.

I have a Ridgid vac (WD1450 to be exact) and a separator that consists of an MDF Thein topper on a 30 gallon or so metal can. The pair has worked well for me for a couple of years. The suction on the end of the hose is usually strong enough to try and partially collapse the can - and gets returned to normal shape when the planer is hooked up.

I'm looking for an improvement, though. It doesn't necessarily involve getting a CT, but I'm not dismissing the idea if it is an actual improvement. In my plan there I have the vac suspended on the wall above the separator, and have also had good thoughts about reversing it - separator up high.

I should list my issues that I've had in order to get some good advice:
  • I use the Bosch hose, and there is a lot of it. I don't have a good way for it to arc up and out of the way for use and storage
  • I don't have a good way of using the cord and hose together, which makes me wonder for those who do have a separator in-line, what's your solution? It's a pretty big reason why I haven't even considered a CT to this point.
  • I use a small diameter long hose for the Fezzies and other capable handhelds, and a shorter, wider diameter hose for the big tools. One is always on the floor when it isn't being used. I wish I could do a more permanent setup.
  • The size of the shop really dictates I have some tools on the other side of the shop, and one of those hoses is laying across the walkway. I'd like to do a small diameter hose hookup to the miter saw, is getting another Bosch hose an option, or do I go smooth surface inside? First is possibly cheaper, and usable in other scenarios.

I'm also debating the idea of putting the planer back on a dust separator cart, like the kit that Rockler sells. I built it before, but trashed it before using it. It would be great for containing the chips from the planer, but not so great having to pull the planer to every tool or run hoses to it to accomplish the DC.
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Old 11-06-2014, 03:08 PM
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Default Re: 144 feet of funkin'

I use an older Jet 2-bagger for DC on my J/P and table saw. I have a Woodstock lid that fits on a metal 30 gallon trash can that separates the big chunks out. The Dust Deputy cyclone is much smaller and would probably work with your vacuum.

As far as using the hose and cord together, I use plastic "Cable Clamps" to attach the cord to the 27mm hose at 2' intervals back to my Festool CTs. They are easy to open and remove the cord if you must. One nice thing about the Festool Plug-It system is that you can leave the heavy cord attached to the hose and it will work on all the tools with Plug-It connections.
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Old 11-06-2014, 03:35 PM
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Default Re: 144 feet of funkin'

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wonderwino View Post
I use an older Jet 2-bagger for DC on my J/P and table saw. I have a Woodstock lid that fits on a metal 30 gallon trash can that separates the big chunks out. The Dust Deputy cyclone is much smaller and would probably work with your vacuum.

As far as using the hose and cord together, I use plastic "Cable Clamps" to attach the cord to the 27mm hose at 2' intervals back to my Festool CTs. They are easy to open and remove the cord if you must. One nice thing about the Festool Plug-It system is that you can leave the heavy cord attached to the hose and it will work on all the tools with Plug-It connections.
I would still need the larger can for the jointer, and in particular the planer (unless I discharged to a bag or something). Due to space and power purposes, a true DC has to wait until at least a new shop - I don't think I want to run it off an extension cord.

As for the Plug-It and dust hose, I was more referring to having to split off the cable at or before the separator. If one just uses the CT, then both hose and cord go straight to it. For those who separate, how do you deal with not having them go to the same spot? Is it worth bundling for a couple of feet?
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Old 11-06-2014, 09:56 PM
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Default Re: 144 feet of funkin'

Your shop looks great to me, the world's smallest woodcloset makes do for me most of the time, I do have a covered space to work outside between the woodcloset and the shed, which houses the radial arm saw, router table, bandsaw, jointer and planer. Works OK most of the time, but I am outside (though covered) for larger assemblies and limited by weather considerations. I have been lucky to have pulled 220 power that works great for the equipment and DC system, so I shouldn't complain, I suppose.

However, I still think that a 12 x 12 shop is not a bad base of operations, you look like you are making the most of it - good work.
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