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Old 04-04-2013, 03:27 AM
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Default Re: Photographing your Woodwork pieces doing it properly

This is really an excellent thread.

Would love to have you fill in a bit more about lighting in that particular box case - how many / where / what kind, etc.

Thanks for taking the time to go through this. I have every confidence that photographing my work can improve!

neil
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 04-04-2013, 03:44 AM
FenceFurniture's Avatar
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Location: Close as dammit to Sydney, Oz
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Default Re: Photographing your Woodwork pieces doing it properly

Good stuff Neil, glad you got something out of it.

Well, the lighting on that box illustrates my point - pure sunlight - that's it, apart from the PL filter to eliminate a couple of minor reflections (but every little bit helps to make a pic better).

This lighting technique is as easy as it gets, and everybody has access to it! A reflector card can be very useful, but in this case the background that the box was sitting on was it's own reflector.

I keep saying it: all artificial lighting is only trying to replicate sunlight, particularly flash lighting. So, ah, why reinvent it? Just use the original and best!

So to answer your questions specifically:
how many 1
where up there
what kind Solar energy
etc. there is no etc

Last edited by FenceFurniture; 04-04-2013 at 03:46 AM.
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 04-04-2013, 06:33 AM
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Default Re: Photographing your Woodwork pieces doing it properly

Thanks, Brett!
This is an excellent read for me, and a lot to learn too.
The polarising filter is certainly something I need to look into. I have a Nikon d300. While photographing my furniture, I've often come up against glare and have struggled to capture the shot I want. I often just tried to block out the light causing it, but was never the right solution.
Thanks again.
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