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-   -   The Light at the End of the Tunnel Wonít be a Strobe (http://www.talkfestool.com/vb/photography-video/2612-light-end-tunnel-won-t-strobe.html)

NedYoung 10-20-2009 02:01 PM

The Light at the End of the Tunnel Wonít be a Strobe
 
Here's an interesting piece on lighting from the head guy of LensRentals.com.

DanClark 10-20-2009 02:48 PM

Re: The Light at the End of the Tunnel Wonít be a Strobe
 
Ned,

I agree with most of what he wrote, especially about the video. Video is becoming a pretty significant feature on all cameras. I think that current OVF DSLRs with video and new combo cams (like the Panasonic GH1) will drive the development of better, cooler, lower cost, higher output lighting options going into the future.

Regards,

Dan.

joraft 10-20-2009 03:38 PM

Re: The Light at the End of the Tunnel Wonít be a Strobe
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by NedYoung (Post 36831)

Here's an interesting piece on lighting from the head guy of LensRentals.com.

Thanks, Ned, that WAS interesting. I'm still struggling with lighting (and just about everything else), not enough time for practicing and experimenting.

hasslefactor 10-20-2009 06:09 PM

Re: The Light at the End of the Tunnel Wonít be a Strobe
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by joraft (Post 36838)
Thanks, Ned, that WAS interesting. I'm still struggling with lighting (and just about everything else), not enough time for practicing and experimenting.

Ain't THAT the truth! Bang Head

MichaelKellough 10-20-2009 09:28 PM

Re: The Light at the End of the Tunnel Wonít be a Strobe
 
I prefer ambient lighting so the development of better sensors is what I'm most looking forward too. Better sensors will benefit video too so the auxiliary lighting needs will be more manageable. KinoFlow fluorescent lights are really nice. A huge benefit to them is that they're dimable.

I don't agree so much about the death of strobes. They're by far the most efficient form of auxiliary lighting. Not even LEDs come close, even if they were cheap to buy.

It was very difficult to learn how to use strobes when you could only see what they did if you could make a Polaroid test. Now that you can instantly see what happened it should be easy to learn to use them. The LensRental guy commented that the behavior of strobes could be unintuitive. I don't see what intuition has to do with lighting. The most basic physics predicts what will happen and it's completely logical, like billiards. You should always have at least a Sunpack with you when doing serious or creative photography.

Wonderwino 10-23-2009 12:03 AM

Re: The Light at the End of the Tunnel Wonít be a Strobe
 
When I get serious, I break out three SB-800s with my Nikon. I can control the output of the two remote strobe from the master mounted on the camera shoe. Really handy.

Nikon has a DVD by Joe McNally about strobe lighting that is really great - well worth the money, no matter what brand you are shooting. :scool:

BobSwenson 10-23-2009 05:15 PM

Re: The Light at the End of the Tunnel Wonít be a Strobe
 
Wow, continuous light, I wonder if Hollywood has heard about this.


Before Strobe there was the flash bulb. Back when we used the one shot color camera you needed a lot of light to shoot pictures of people. For still life pictures we used the newly discovered continuous light.
It's like reinventing the wheel.


The one Shot color camera recoded three images on black and white glass plates. The light was separated by two partial mirrors and filtered through red, green and blue glass filters.


Our main light was an ordinary galvanized wash tub with three porcelain sockets spaced inside .
We used #1 photo floods for guide lights and than replaced them with #1 flash bulbs for the shot.
Used the same 110 volts to fire the bulbs.


Once a month we did an ad for the A&P using 11 X 14 Kodachrome (ASA 10) with one case of flash bulbs per shot plus a slew of peanut bulbs in the meat cases.


Than came strobes, big strobes, really big strobes, the light from the sun light bulb on full load could ignite a sheet of news paper held six inches in fount of it. Many more stories, so little time.

Photography is lighting and composition. The rest of it is technical gobble y gook
Bob

And than came the model A

MichaelKellough 10-23-2009 06:03 PM

Re: The Light at the End of the Tunnel Wonít be a Strobe
 
Bob, more stories = more better for us :thumbsup2:

joraft 10-23-2009 06:06 PM

Re: The Light at the End of the Tunnel Wonít be a Strobe
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by BobSwenson (Post 37282)

Photography is lighting and composition.

So true!

I still have a LOT to learn about photography, but that is something I figured out early on. :)

BobSwenson 10-23-2009 08:00 PM

Re: The Light at the End of the Tunnel Wonít be a Strobe
 
The studio strobes that we used came with a charging unit and individual condensers that you could connect in series. The small bulb could handle four condensers, the sunlight bulb would take many more and we had lots of them. We mounted a sunlight in a spare 5000W spot light to see how it would work. One night just for fun we aimed it the corner of 42nd street and 5th ave,we were on the 7th floor at 37th and 5th , NYC, packed on all the condensers we had and fired away. Startled people stopped dead in their tracks.


There were five famous Photographers in the studio including the great Herbert Matter. I was assistant to the the president and the production manager when one of the salesmen ask me if I could stretch a car. Sure I can, I said. (smart ass youth) I proceeded to cast two 6” prisms in clear acrylic, satisfied that it would work I had them made in optical glass and mounted in a box with a set of gears so that they would turn in opposite direction. The prisms were mounted on their center points and had no optical effect when they were parallel. Set in front of an 8 X 10 camera with a 14” lens you could turn the nob and stretch a car ten to fifteen percent with little distortion.


And along came truth in advertising.


How did I get into wood working? Michael knows, I built set after set. Advertising photography is a lot more than snapping the shutter.
Bob


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