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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 08-05-2008, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by DanClark View Post

How about this... Find a store that has the camera and flashes, and will allow you to use your own memory card...

That's a good idea, Dan. There are several fair sized camera stores in my area, but I can't say that I've ever been in any of them. I'll check them out, and see how accommodating they might be.
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Old 08-05-2008, 08:27 PM
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Another thing that worries me is that most experienced photographers say that it is the lens that is the primary equipment, with the camera body being the accessory. If the body is $3000, how high can the investment in lenses go? You can't buy a great camera and hang mediocre lenses on it.

This could be steeper and more slippery than the well known Festool slope.


For example, this wide angle lens is getting raves as being the sharpest out there, but it's $1600.

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Old 08-05-2008, 10:18 PM
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I've read many photographers spend as much or more on a lense as they did on the camera. If you want the sharpest images, you have to buy the best lenses. However, I guess it depends on what you're taking pictures of if you need the sharpest photos or not.

Does anyone have any experience with the, for example, 28-200 or 28-300 aftermarket zooms (Sigma, etc)? It seems they would be a good way to only purchase one lense, for now, and still shoot wide angle to telephoto. Plus not having to change lenses to get the shot you want.

Tom.
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Old 08-07-2008, 04:44 PM
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Went to a local camera store to check out the D700.

These things are currently on an alottment, and this store has already sold every one of theirs. But they did have one to demo, and I got to play with it for a while. The kid behind the counter was nervous about letting me stick my own card in it, so I didn't push it. He said to come back when the owner was there, but I feel a little guilty about taking up too much of their time if I'm likely to buy it online anyway (if I buy one at all).

I'm not even a very experienced photographer, and even I could tell how many fanatastic features the camera has. The look and feel, the placement of the controls, the screen, the menus. It was a little bigger and heavier than I expected. Definitely not something I'd want to carry around all the time (not to mention the paranoia of something happening to it).

But now that I've seen it and held it how will I be ever happy with anything else?

WARNING! PUTTING ONE OF THESE THINGS IN YOUR HANDS CAN BE DISASTROUS FOR YOUR WALLET! STAY AWAY!
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Old 08-07-2008, 06:13 PM
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The look and feel, the placement of the controls, the screen, the menus.
John,

The D700's body is supposed to be almost exactly the same as the D300 body except for the bigger prism hood. For me, a big part of the attraction is the feel and ergonomics.

A few months ago, I was in a shop looking at a D3. I was surprised that I didn't like the feel. Then the shop owner handed me his personal D300. WHOA!!! It felt AWESOME!!!

A big part of it is the little things. Did you notice that the hand grip wheels on the front and back are slightly canted to match the angle of your thumb and first finger? How about the subtle curves in the hand grip - the front back and side are all slightly curved and each one is slightly different.

That's a very tasty camera!

Dan.
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Old 08-07-2008, 06:27 PM
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That's a very tasty camera!


Dan, right now I'm working on a plan to finance one of these. It involves selling some of my wife's jewelry. Unfortunately, getting away with that also means breaking a window and filing a false police report.

The only downside I can see is that getting caught would take SOME of the fun out of owning the camera.
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Old 08-07-2008, 08:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanClark View Post

... For me, a big part of the attraction is the feel and ergonomics.

... Did you notice that the hand grip wheels on the front and back are slightly canted to match the angle of your thumb and first finger? How about the subtle curves in the hand grip - the front back and side are all slightly curved and each one is slightly different.

Dan, one the first things I noticed was how this thing fit in my hand, and the angle of the controls. Even as a novice I knew it felt right.

It did feel massive to me, and a little more so with the MD-D10 power pack attached to the bottom. This is the first time I've held anything even close to a pro camera, so maybe it isn't that big in comparison.

There's been some mis-information already out there about this camera. For example, I've seen complaints about a flimsy rubber cover for the card slot, but it isn't anythiing of the kind. It's a substantial plastic door on the side, with a metal hinge that slides back and pops out. The rubber cover on the bottom is for the slot and contacts for the power pack.

They didn't have an SB-900 flash unit, but I tried it with both the 400 and 800. Not sure what I'd do, but right now I'm focusing on whether to get the camera. Decisions on flash units are a ways down the road. And of course, then there are lenses to consider.

Watch out! Slippery slope ahead.
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 08-08-2008, 09:25 PM
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So far the only negative comment I've read about the camera was the viewfinder doesn't offer the same coverage as the D300 and D3 cameras. That might only get annoying if you were using the D700 as a backup for the D3 and switching between the two cameras.

Tom.
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 08-09-2008, 03:44 PM
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So far the only negative comment I've read about the camera was the viewfinder doesn't offer the same coverage as the D300 and D3 cameras...

Tom, you're touching on something that has had me a little concerned about choosing the best camera for me.

I've never even held anything more than a basic "point and shoot" before. When I picked up that D700 I was so in awe that my heart actually started to race a little (silly isn't it). I totally fell in love with that camera, but then I've really had nothing worth comparing it to.

I don't have the time or knowledge to adequately compare this thing to every good camera now out there. So how do I make such an important decision?
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 08-09-2008, 06:38 PM
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John, I'm having the same problem. I just own a couple of non-dslr digital cameras. I would like to buy the best camera I can afford (I guess the reasoning behind buying Festool too), but there are many models I'm considering. I really haven't even decided between Canon and Nikon yet.

Now, after reading your posts, I'm worried I'll pick up the D700 and spend more than I can afford!

Tom.
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