talkFestool  

Go Back   talkFestool > Projects, Methods, and Techniques > Home Improvement Projects

Home Improvement Projects Foundations to finials, watts to wainscotting, tear-outs to tiling? This is the place!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 09-25-2009, 03:31 AM
Wonderwino's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Grew up in Peekskill, NY; Now living in Northwest Kansas
Posts: 2,896
Default Re: Fixing walls

FESTOOL LEBANON DUDES:

I think you need to send Randy a Planex for evaluation. He gets these really challenging jobs that are on higher floors than he is. I know he'll give it a great review.
__________________
Water separates the people of the world; wine unites them.

"If you have good manners and are well spoken, you can be welcome anywhere." -Mom, 1959
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 08-12-2011, 08:36 PM
MichaelKellough's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: The northernmost end of the southernmost county of New York
Posts: 4,525
Default Re: Fixing walls

I was going to start another thread but Randy's tips are so good they deserve another round of views.

I have to flatten and smooth some really crappy old plaster walls so I can do a nice job of installing pre-finished door casings and base mould. The part that's really crappy is probably drywall compound applied directly over lumps creating furrows etc. And, there are layers of various paints on top of those lumps.

Since the Planex still isn't here, I'm wondering which sander to use? I started off thinking this would be a good reason to buy an RAS 115. Then I read Randy's thread and although I don't have a Rotex but I do have the Bosch 1250 Dual-Mode ROBosch 1250 Dual-Mode RO which is pretty much the equivalent. However, I also have the AEG belt sander and sanding frame which seems like an even better choice since the frame physically promotes making the sanded surface flat.


The AEG looks just like this since Festool bought the factory. I should add that it's a variable speed sander too.
A good article on belt sanders and sanding frames is here.
All of these tools have pretty good dust collection, the RAS probably running in last place DC-wise. My brain says the AEG is the best tool but even though it is only a 3" machine it would be a real workout to use on walls.

Help me think this through...

Last edited by MichaelKellough; 08-12-2011 at 09:01 PM.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 08-12-2011, 08:44 PM
Poto's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 9,000
Default Re: Fixing walls

Could you suspend your belt sander (like Laurie did) to make it less of a workout? Maybe hang it from a rod so you can move laterally?
__________________
I don't have as many Festools as Fred. Or Marcou's, or Brese's, or Lie-Nielsen's, or Lee Valley's, or Blue Spruce's, or Harold and Saxon's, or...
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 08-12-2011, 08:49 PM
MichaelKellough's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: The northernmost end of the southernmost county of New York
Posts: 4,525
Default Re: Fixing walls

Quick reply!!

That would certainly help if there's a practical way to do it. It would have to be from a constant force spring reel. A simple pulley/drop line/counterweight would get in the way.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 08-12-2011, 09:01 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 74
Default Re: Fixing walls

Is this for your own place, or a client's?

Depending on the age of the place, there's a reasonable chance you are going to be stirring up either lead or asbestos in that plaster. I like my lungs quite a bit, so I'd take an abundance of caution before I started belt sanding those walls.

You could take them down (yeah, there's still a ridiculous amount of dust that way), or skin them with some 1/4 drywall. You might need to do some furring to get an even plane before you skin, if things are really wonky.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 08-12-2011, 09:08 PM
MichaelKellough's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: The northernmost end of the southernmost county of New York
Posts: 4,525
Default Re: Fixing walls

It's for a client Steve. The area is a long hallway but there is a back entrance they can use if the dust gets bad. The walls are plaster on wood lathe so we are not even considering taking that off. It's the haphazard repairs and decorating that have added lumps on top of the original plaster that make fitting trim a nightmare. I just want to get a level playing field.

The CT and a good dust mask should keep us from getting too much more stupid. No children live there.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 08-12-2011, 09:52 PM
Poto's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 9,000
Default Re: Fixing walls

How about instead of hanging the sander, you support it from underneath? You could mount it to vertical arm on a trolley that could move laterally down the hallway. Moving the arm up and down (or the sander up and down on the arm) would give you different heights for your pass.

If you had really straight tracks for the trolley to run on, you could use that for ensuring that the walls are flat. Just run the sander horizontally a set distance from the wall, and it'll automatically flatten the high spots.
__________________
I don't have as many Festools as Fred. Or Marcou's, or Brese's, or Lie-Nielsen's, or Lee Valley's, or Blue Spruce's, or Harold and Saxon's, or...
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #18 (permalink)  
Old 08-12-2011, 10:00 PM
MichaelKellough's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: The northernmost end of the southernmost county of New York
Posts: 4,525
Default Re: Fixing walls

Sheesh Peter!
You might want to cut down on the caffeine a little
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 08-13-2011, 01:54 AM
Poto's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 9,000
Default Re: Fixing walls

I don't drink coffee ... I'm always like this!
__________________
I don't have as many Festools as Fred. Or Marcou's, or Brese's, or Lie-Nielsen's, or Lee Valley's, or Blue Spruce's, or Harold and Saxon's, or...
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 08-13-2011, 06:01 AM
RWeber's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 1,212
Default Re: Fixing walls

In my experience, plaster doesn't sand. Oh, you might scuff it a little, but you're looking to do something that most abrasives aren't really made for. Kind of hard to take a stab at without looking, but, things I'd consider:
Its easier to add a little skim than grind a little plaster.
Sometimes, scribing the back of the trim is the only way. Charge accordingly.
If there's really bad areas, it's possible (probably not my first inclination, but possible) to remove the area with a diamond blade and patch it back level.
Belt sander + wall to me seems like a good recipe for nice deep track marks.
Though, in the end, why prefinished? It seems like the logical route through this maze is to fit the trim to what you have, and if that means cutting, or sanding a joint, or whatever, then mask it and finish it in place.
I know, random thoughts here, but interior finish, trim, that's my thing. My first choice in an older setting like that is to try to make lemonade, so to speak. Rather than tear into something new and try to make the wall something it isn't, make the trim fit well enough nobody ever notices the walls are jacked.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:31 PM.