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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 10-18-2015, 07:24 PM
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Default Chicago's own Jeff Miller - FWW Jack Plane review

Having taken a class or two from him, it's nice to see some one who really likes and uses Hand Tools daily be chosen by Fine Woodworking to review that venerable friend, the Jack Plane.
Although not a surprise that LV got best value and L-N best overall, he also included a good pondering of bevel up planes as well in a separate process during the review process.
Also, Jeff is very big about ergonomics while using hand tools and how he relates body stance during a given operation.
He added some thoughts about adjustments for many of the reviewed planes which is something you don't appreciate until you've got the tool in your hand.
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Old 10-19-2015, 04:39 PM
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Default Re: Chicago's own Jeff Miller - FWW Jack Plane review

I really enjoyed reading that review - very informative. One thing I particularly liked was understanding what makes a good plane good. The lack of flatness, out of squareness, thin metal, and poor fit and mechanism of the cheap ones really makes them pretty worthless. Once again supporting the notion: get good quality the first time, and only pay for it once.
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Old 10-19-2015, 06:05 PM
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Default Re: Chicago's own Jeff Miller - FWW Jack Plane review

Exactly Peter, you 'know' it once you've struggled with poor quality planes, and upgraded to really good ones.
Now if the blades could just sharpen themselves.....
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Old 10-22-2015, 05:40 PM
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Default Re: Chicago's own Jeff Miller - FWW Jack Plane review

Jeff writes good articles, and in this case did do a lot of comparisons. However I found it interesting that the planes chosen were #5s - jack planes - and no where, at any time, was there a recommendation, or even a suggestion, to prepare the blades with a camber for hogging. The planes were only used with a straight blade ala smoothers. This is not the forte of the #5 (which is more typically used as a rough plane with an 8" radius blade). Indeed, a flat sole is not needed, and this factor could have changed the results completely. As a result, the article seemed to miss the point for me.

Regards from Perth

Derek
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Old 10-22-2015, 09:52 PM
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Default Re: Chicago's own Jeff Miller - FWW Jack Plane review

Quote:
Originally Posted by derekcohen View Post
Jeff writes good articles, and in this case did do a lot of comparisons. However I found it interesting that the planes chosen were #5s - jack planes - and no where, at any time, was there a recommendation, or even a suggestion, to prepare the blades with a camber for hogging. The planes were only used with a straight blade ala smoothers. This is not the forte of the #5 (which is more typically used as a rough plane with an 8" radius blade). Indeed, a flat sole is not needed, and this factor could have changed the results completely. As a result, the article seemed to miss the point for me.

Regards from Perth

Derek
I dunno. I think for many people here in the US, the 5 is used as a longer smoother and a slightly rougher work plane without changing the blade unless they learned about camber blades or had an extra one that they reshaped to that radius. If you write to FWW about the article, or send them an e-mail, maybe they can shed more light on why no suggestion was given for radius blades on a #5.... I could also just ask Mr. Miller since he's local...........
From what I've seen, a scrub plane or a #6/Fore Plane might be the 'roughing' plane before a #5 for some people.
But, Derek, it could all be a 'what you learned/where you learned it' kind of thing as well. Maybe even a Generational thing.
Maybe you should start a poll somewhere and find out from around the world Plane Users. That would be interesting to see between not only newbies and experienced wood workers, but region by region/Country as well.
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Old 10-23-2015, 12:56 AM
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Default Re: Chicago's own Jeff Miller - FWW Jack Plane review

I wonder if Chris Schwarz will comment on this? After all, his #5 is his show piece for his company. In his videos he goes to some effort to demonstrate the purpose of this plane as the "coarse" plane. He also typically uses the #5 with a 8" radius blade. This is followed by the Medium plane, the jointer, and then the Fine plane, a smoother.

For some, no doubt one size fits all, and a #5 is used to do several jobs. I accept this. I think that was the thrust of Jeff's article. However this is an incomplete view, since for many others, the jack is used to hog waste. And then the important feature of such a plane is the high amount of camber you will add to the blade. Using a straight blade is very inefficient in these circumstances.

Regards from Perth

Derek
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Old 10-23-2015, 02:03 AM
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Default Re: Chicago's own Jeff Miller - FWW Jack Plane review

I haven't seen or read the article by Jeff, but know of him as a good woodworker.
As far as a traditional #5 jack goes, I agree with Derek. Heavily chambered iron and hogging off material is its forte. I'm sure Swartz would say the same.
That said, I use my Veritas bevel up jack for everything from smoothing, jointing (not long boards) and shooting. It's a real workhorse.
My old Stanley jack bench plane is the material hogger in my shop.
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Old 10-23-2015, 01:37 PM
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Default Re: Chicago's own Jeff Miller - FWW Jack Plane review

Quote:
Originally Posted by derekcohen View Post
I wonder if Chris Schwarz will comment on this? After all, his #5 is his show piece for his company. In his videos he goes to some effort to demonstrate the purpose of this plane as the "coarse" plane. He also typically uses the #5 with a 8" radius blade. This is followed by the Medium plane, the jointer, and then the Fine plane, a smoother.

For some, no doubt one size fits all, and a #5 is used to do several jobs. I accept this. I think that was the thrust of Jeff's article. However this is an incomplete view, since for many others, the jack is used to hog waste. And then the important feature of such a plane is the high amount of camber you will add to the blade. Using a straight blade is very inefficient in these circumstances.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Do either you or Okami use a Scrub Plane for hogging out waste?
Just curious. Or is it that the Scrub Plane is a rougher cut than what you want out of your Radiused #5 blade, so you don't typically bother with the Scrub Plane since you're not taking that much material off?
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Old 10-23-2015, 03:27 PM
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Default Re: Chicago's own Jeff Miller - FWW Jack Plane review

No, I don't own a scrub plane.
Being a full time woodworker, I'd use a power tool or machine before a hand tool at that stage of a project to be honest. Gotta pay the bills you see..
I think Derek on the other hand has every type of hand plane out there, and uses them.
For removing a lot of material fast, I actually prefer a Japanese Kanna rather than a western plane.
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Old 10-23-2015, 04:11 PM
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Default Re: Chicago's own Jeff Miller - FWW Jack Plane review

Quote:
Originally Posted by Okami View Post
No, I don't own a scrub plane.
Being a full time woodworker, I'd use a power tool or machine before a hand tool at that stage of a project to be honest. Gotta pay the bills you see..
I think Derek on the other hand has every type of hand plane out there, and uses them.
For removing a lot of material fast, I actually prefer a Japanese Kanna rather than a western plane.
Picture of a Kanna?
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