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Old 12-17-2010, 06:25 PM
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Default Parrafin wax

I've picked up a bit of LN's wax from time to time at the shows. It works well, but I'm assuming that parrafin in parrafin. Right? I'm guessing that the stuff I pick up somewhere (I'm guessing in the canning dept) will be the same? Anyone aware of this stuff causing a problem with finishes?

Mike
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Old 12-17-2010, 08:41 PM
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Default Re: Parrafin wax

I've used a block of normal paraffin wax on my tools for decades (yes, it has lasted that long too). I've found it to be the longest lasting and easiest applying lubricant for machine surfaces.

One of the most critical uses was as a hot-lube for the stepped drill bit from my Kreg Jig. Every time I set the drill down, I lay the stepped drill bit across the block of wax. The heat from the previous operation melts some more wax and seeps into the flutes of the bit. (I cannot stress enough how important this is to the longevity of the bit!!!)

I also use it to lube the top of the shaper before running frame stock with the powerfeeder. It is the only lube that will sustain lubrication for several hundred feed of stock.

When it comes to machines, paraffin is the only lube I will use. I even have a bunch of alleged machine lubes from some company wanting my feedback, but I still prefer straight paraffin.
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Old 12-17-2010, 10:13 PM
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Default Re: Parrafin wax

That's interesting, Rick. So do you rub a block of paraffin on your tablesaw deck as well? I've used different protectants that claim they lubricate the top (TopSaver, T9), but I find they are only smooth for the first day

I have used the drill trick, too. Not with a step drill bit, but still. I have a block of paraffin for canning I use to place the drill bit against when doing a lot of drilling. Everything is so much smoother with that technique.
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Old 12-18-2010, 02:50 AM
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Default Re: Parrafin wax

The tablesaw doesn't normally need a lube, but yes, I have used paraffin on it at times. It lasts longer than other waxes.
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Old 12-18-2010, 03:36 AM
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Default Re: Parrafin wax

Paraffin is pretty good but lumpy.

On machine surfaces I prefer ordinary old school furniture paste wax, preferably with Carnauba wax. I use Butcher's Wax or Behlens. It's way easier to apply smoothly.

This looks good, "Trewax has the highest percent of Brazilian Carnauba wax of any commercial paste wax. Carnauba is the world's hardest natural vegetable wax, which is why you get such a tough finish with a bright, long-lasting sheen."

'In the shop I keep a rag in the can so I can easily wax the bottoms of my metal planes. It makes them slide like nothing else."
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Old 12-18-2010, 03:41 AM
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Default Re: Parrafin wax

I also use canning wax (paraffin) on all my steel machined surfaces. As has been said it lasts much longer than other rust preventatives. Once I've waxed up a surface I'll play a heat gun on it & allow the wax to penetrate a little.
Waxing a bicycle chain (dip the cleaned chain in melted wax) lasts much longer than any "special" chain oils or lubricants. It also prevents getting "biker's tattoos" on your leg from the oily chain.
Occam's razor applied here...

EDIT: I forgot about planes & hand saws -- I also have been using paste wax not paraffin on my planes & hand saws although I do see very experienced hand tool users using paraffin.

Last edited by RONWEN; 12-18-2010 at 03:56 AM.
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Old 12-18-2010, 03:51 AM
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Default Re: Parrafin wax

Using the heat gun on paraffin in a garage would be okay but I don't plan to try it in my basement. I wonder what my CO1 alarm/meter would think?
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Old 12-18-2010, 04:00 AM
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Default Re: Parrafin wax

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelKellough View Post
Using the heat gun on paraffin in a garage would be okay but I don't plan to try it in my basement. I wonder what my CO1 alarm/meter would think?
I haven't noticed it tripping in the kitchen when canning preserves. I don't have a monitor in the garage.
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Old 12-18-2010, 04:10 AM
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Default Re: Parrafin wax

Thinking back to melting it in the attached garage to pour onto my surfboard in high school. My mother wasn't pleased.

Back then there wasn't any attempt to disguise or reduce the odor of petrochemicals.
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Old 12-18-2010, 01:13 PM
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Default Re: Parrafin wax

Typically you would plane off any residue that might cause an issue with finishing, however if you're working with an open grained wood like walnut or mahogany some of this material could possibly get trapped in the pores of the wood. As a precaution you may want to wipe the surfaces down with some mineral spirits prior to finishing or applying a grain filler.

Ron
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