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Hand Tools Hand tools, clamps, measuring, and all that other stuff

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Old 02-27-2010, 02:06 PM
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Default Comprehensive tool list

I am looking for some guidance on what hand tools are considered necessary and if anyone has input on those that would be really nice wants.

I currently own a few Festool power tools, cs12, ct22, ts55, and rotex150. I have pretty much decided to purchase the of1400 as well.

My short term goal is to make about 14-22 book cases for a dedicated library once the basement is closer to being finished(24-48m out). Long term I would then like to connect the units into a 3.5 sided wall of continues book cases and trim them out to look like a set of built ins.

I currently own an assortment of hand tools:
craftsman screw drivers
hack saw
chisels from walmart and harbor freight
chalk line
odd hammers and mallets

I am now committed to buying a set of tools that will serve me well and also be able to stand the test of time that I can pass them on to a generation or two behind me. Thus, I would prefer to purchase the best tools I can afford. As far as a budget goes, I do not have an upper limit, I am no six figure income kind of guy but I would rather wait and save my money if it means a tool may be twice as much but I know for sure it will last a lifetime vs another tool that may not. I am not looking for a work of art, but rather a tool that is built to the tightest specifications.

Thus, the real questions are:
1. Based on the need list, is there anything I am missing or should omit?
2. What are some wants that will greatly improve the precision of my work and/or significantly reduce my build time?
3. I would like to stay brand agnostic because I am sure that can become very windows vs. mac kind of discussion, but who are the standout names and what are some that get good reviews but tend to be tools that paid for those reviews?
4. Based on the above project, is there any real order that I should buy from the list or are most all of the tools below considered a baseline to being able to get some work done?

Tool list:
60 1/2 Adjustable mouth block plane
4 1/2 smoothing plane 55 degree angle
62 low angle jack plane

marking knife
try square
marking guage
mortise gauge
sliding bevel
steel rules

rip saw
tenon saw - crosscut
tenon saw - rip cut
dovetail saw

bevel edged chisels
mortise chisels
paring chisels
beech mallet

clamps, clamps and then more clamps

This is a rough idea of the style of bookcase that I would want to build but without the top crown or a crown that does not have a peak.
http://lib.store.yahoo.net/lib/plansnow/classbkc.jpg
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Old 02-27-2010, 03:21 PM
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Default Re: Comprehensive tool list

Shawn

Welcome to the forum!

Based on the project you've outlined, I think a domino would be an excellent purchase.

And a long track for the saw, build some parallel guides like Eiji did. I'm assuming that you'll be building the cases out of plywood.

I think your hand tool list is a great start. Tool purchases can go on and on, I'd let the nature of your projects define your needs, but there are some fundamental basics that anyone will require. But, if you have the domino, you're not going to have to chop out mortices, at least in the short term so you don't need those chisels.

I don't see an MFT on the list, if you're going to do trim work you'll need someway to accurately cross cut. QAWS has some great pointers here on using the table.

I'm sure others who do more handwork than I will have more relevant comments so I"ll stop

Jay
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Old 02-27-2010, 03:26 PM
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Default Re: Comprehensive tool list

Hi welcome to talkFestool,

I am not a hand tool expertby any means. But you will get plenty of input from others here.

It would appear from your list that you are planning to do a lot of hand tool work?

My only thought / comment is that the bookcases you plan to build lend themselves to power tools very well. I will post more in your other thread

advice on festool purchase

In general I would go for measuring and marking hand tools first. You will need them for everything.

Seth
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Old 02-27-2010, 04:03 PM
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Default Re: Comprehensive tool list

Shawn,

Hi. Welcome to talkFestool. I looks like you're asking the right questions, are planning ahead well, and have a great start on the tools. Regarding your tool list and your needs, I think there are some key tools to consider:
  • Festool MFT (or maybe two) - This will greatly increase the usefulness of your TS55.
  • Festool LR32 - Given the number of cabinets, I suspect that you'll be drilling a LOT shelf holes for your cabinets. The LR32 is especially good at this. Here's a thread with some videos that describe the system very well: Great LR32 hole drilling system videos.. Brice Burrell (Burrell Custom Carpentry) has a great description of the LR32 with animated drawings: LR32 hole drilling system.
  • Festool ETS150/3 and LS130 sanders - Given the number of bookcases, you will probably do a LOT of sanding. These sanders should be a great compliment to your RO150. of sheet good
  • Incra Guaranteed Square and rules: Measuring, Marking & Layout. I have the the square and several of the marking rules, including the T-rules in sizes from 4.5" to 18". I find the shorter ones and the 18" one to be especially useful. I use the 18" one for marking sheet goods. Brice has a review of the Guaranteed Square and 12" marking rule set: Review: Incra square, marking rule set.
  • Cutting table - It looks like you will be cutting a LOT of sheet goods. A good cutting table will help for breaking down the sheet goods into usable sizes. (After that, you can use the MFT(s).) Here are a couple of threads that you should find useful:
http://www.talkfestool.com/vb/genera...own-sheet.html
http://www.talkfestool.com/vb/creati...ing-table.html
There are lots of posts on talkFestool that should help. On the main toolbar, click "Search" to find the right ones. For example, search for "LR32" (no quotes) and you'll find a bunch of posts.

Another great resource of Festool and woodworking info is FOG:Festool Owners Group. Check out Dave Ronyak's entertainment center: Four Piece Entertainment Center and Bookcases. Also check out his Gallery: http://festoolownersgroup.com/Copper....php?album=132. Lots of pics about his entertainment center. In the gallery, you'll find this 81 page PDF describing the process of building his entertainment center: http://festoolownersgroup.com/Copper...ice_format.pdf.

I hope this helps.

Regards,

Dan.

p.s. That's a nice book case. To show pics in posts, you can embed the image in several ways. The second part of this post describes how to embed the images in a post: Using An Album Pic In A Post. This works well when embedding picture links to other websites. Essentially you just click the little "mountain" button in the task bar while writing your post and then paste in the link. It automatically wraps "img" tags around the pic's URL address and it displays in your post. For example, to display the bookcase pic, the link with the img tags would look like this:
Quote:
[IMG]http://lib.store.yahoo.net/lib/plansnow/classbkc.jpg[/IMG]
and display like this:
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Old 02-27-2010, 06:04 PM
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Default Re: Comprehensive tool list

Oooo! This is fun! I love spending other people's money!

You've got a good list going, but I'd echo other people's comments, and suggest that you acquire tools as you find that you need them.

That being said, you're really going to want a low-angle apron plane (Lie-Nielsen Toolworks USA | Block Planes). For the adjustable mouth block plane, you should consider the Lee Valley one (Veritas® Standard Block Plane - Lee Valley Tools) because you can purchase a knob and tote for it (Optional Grips for the Veritas® Low-Angle Block Plane - Lee Valley Tools) that makes it quite a bit more versatile.

I strongly recommend some good rasps (Auriou are amazing if you can find them), though the project will determine the size and shape you need.

You'll need some scrapers, both flat and rounded profiles. And a file and burnisher (though a screwdriver shaft works fine).

I can't live without my bandsaw. If you're doing anything with curves, or doing resawing (I never thought that I would, but now I do it all the time) you'll love it. Get something with at least a 2.5 hp motor.

I love my Bridge City Toolworks shoulder plane (HP-7). It's wonderful for mortise and tenon joinery. The Lie-Nielsen rabbet block plane is also wonderful for squaring up cheeks and shoulders of tenons.

Get Dave Jeske's (Blue Spruce Toolworks) mallet. It's so beautiful you'll want to walk around the house holding it. But it works like a charm, and it's indestructible. (www.bluesprucetoolworks.com - Mallets) His chisels are also astounding - wish I'd bought them first, though I love my Lie-Nielsen bevel-edge socket chisels.

You'll want to get the ETS150/5 or 150/3 for sanding. I went without for several years, just using my Rotex. I was nuts. The ETS is amazingly better than the Rotex at getting a surface smooth, fast.

And I have to agree that you should consider the Domino. It's a big upfront cost (though you can get good deals on ebay if you're fast), but the time saving over mortise and tenon joinery is pretty astounding. Especially for bookcases.

Hope this helps!
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Old 02-27-2010, 08:07 PM
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Default Re: Comprehensive tool list

I agree with Poto on the Domino -- It will be indispensable for building bookcase carcases, etc.
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Old 02-27-2010, 09:21 PM
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Default Re: Comprehensive tool list

Quote:
Originally Posted by RONWEN View Post

I agree with Poto on the Domino ...
Me too, in fact, I'll agree with all of Poto's advice.
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Old 02-27-2010, 10:02 PM
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Default Re: Comprehensive tool list

Quote:
Originally Posted by joraft View Post
Me too, in fact, I'll agree with all of Poto's advice.
Not so totally -- If the plan is mainly bookcases (no mention of sculpted furniture) the Auriou rasps can wait awhile, at least until he gets into shaping some furniture legs, etc. Certainly sometime around the purchase of a bandsaw.
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Old 02-27-2010, 10:04 PM
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Default Re: Comprehensive tool list

Depends on what sort of detail work he wants to do. A rasp might be useful on a shapely cornice...

I'd also recommend that Shawn plan on replacing all his old tools. With the Festools and nice hand tools, he'll notice how crappy they are pretty fast!
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Old 02-27-2010, 10:05 PM
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Default Re: Comprehensive tool list

Quote:
Originally Posted by RONWEN View Post

Not so totally -- If the plan is mainly bookcases (no mention of sculpted furniture) the Auriou rasps can wait awhile, at least until he gets into shaping some furniture legs, etc. Certainly sometime around the purchase of a bandsaw.
Okay, I'll agree with MOST of Poto's advice.
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