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Old 12-22-2011, 06:50 PM
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Default planer recommendation for fir strips

I did this post over on the fog Glue for Curved Trusses and decided to post the following question here because you all seam to love your hand planes.

So I have these strips of fir that is 1.5 inches wide 1/4 inch thick and 8 feet long.

So here goes what would the best low cost plane to buy to take care of the saw curfs and bring them down to about 3/16" to 7/32". I do have a granite stone and sand papers to about 2000 grit as well as a guide to put an edge on the blade.

I have a Woodcraft, Lowes and Homedepot next to me I can't really buy online because of the deadline on this project.

So what are your recommendations given my limitations?

any other thoughts?
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Old 12-22-2011, 07:59 PM
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Default Re: planer recommendation for fir strips

https://picasaweb.google.com/mishles...eat=directlink

Hope adding these photo's work. These planes where given to me by one of my customers.

One says Stanley Bailey No 4 and the other is Made in the usa. Are these appropriate for what I'm doing? Is it worth hanging on to these? Maybe get better steel in them?
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Old 12-22-2011, 11:47 PM
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Default Re: planer recommendation for fir strips

Don't buy a plane at Lowes or HD - they're total crap. If Woodcraft carries Lie Nielsen, then spring for that. I'd suggest the #4. The Wood River planes are apparently not bad, and the new Stanely Sweetheart planes are also fine, I've heard. But if you want something that'll last, get the LN.

Or, for about the same price, you could get the Rigid 13" planer. Just sayin'...
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Old 12-23-2011, 12:37 AM
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Default Re: planer recommendation for fir strips

Thank's I will check woodcraft out. My wife want's me to move towards making less noise so hence the hand plan and I am in the works of building a thickness sander.
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Old 12-23-2011, 12:50 AM
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Default Re: planer recommendation for fir strips

They say the new woodriver ain't bad..
What you should remember is, a hand plane truely is for life.. Good or bad.
With that in mind, I'd go with the best I could afford.
LN & LV planes are very good! The LV bevel-up planes are very nice, and I'd say their bevel-up jack can do pretty much anything you'll need.
Clifton from Sheffield, England makes very nice bench planes too!
For good wooden planes, HNT Gordon from Australia are excellent! Push or pull with ease, very versatile design, and the bedding angle of the planes are high and the mouths are tight, making easy work of difficult woods. Afterall, they were designed with Australian hardwoods in mind.
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Old 12-23-2011, 12:52 AM
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Default Re: planer recommendation for fir strips

Depending on how many pieces, you could use a card scrapper. I wouldn't use a power planner on wood that thin. A thickness drum sander works best. Card scrappers if kept sharp work well. Just clamp down one end and work your way to the other end being careful when getting to the end so as not to snap a piece off on the return stroke. I wouldn't use the scrappers if you are laminating multiple pieces together.
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Old 12-23-2011, 12:58 AM
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Default Re: planer recommendation for fir strips

I'm making curved trusses with 14 layers each @ 6 trusses for the first batch.

The next batch is going to be about 32 trusses only a much bigger expanse.
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Old 12-23-2011, 01:26 AM
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Default Re: planer recommendation for fir strips

Sorry, but I can already tell this is going to be long. It hits several topics close to my heart.

First of all, since you are building trusses, check with the manufacturer of your glue to be sure it is capable of structural applications. Many of the glues discussed in this post are formulated for veneer or furniture grade loads, not to create load bearing trusses.

Poto is a wise man . Consider that noisy power planer. Yes you can do this with a handplane or a scraper, but it will take a longgg time. Also, in laminations, it is critical that the lam be extremely consistent in thickness. For instance, if you tend to cut a little deeper down the board than at the beginning, that difference will be multipled by the number of lams you are using. Say the end is 1/64 thinner than the beginning and you have ten lams, the result will be 10/64 thinner...

Springback is inversely proportional to the number of lams you have. A larger number of thinner lams will have less springback than fewer thicker lams. Depending on your application, you may not have to worry too much about springback as long as it is consistent from one piece to the next.

I make a lot of laminated furniture. I usually power plane the lams down to about 3/32 without problems. The straighter the grain the better. If you have knots or highly figured wood, expect to lose some pieces in the planer. Always do a dry bend to see if the lam will bend over your form without breaking - depends on the species, figure, knots, etc. etc.

If you chose a urea formaldehyde glue, please use a respirator while mixing - the powder is very unhealthy. And yes, it will smell. Give it a good airing before assembly.

If you have some extra strips, and you should, try and see if the 1/4 strip will bend over your form. If they do, just do that and use fewer, no need to plane them at all.

Titebond will work. I have used Titebond 1, 2 and 3 for lams. The main issue is working time. Three has a slightly longer working time. In any case, with titebond you will need to move fast. Have two or three helpers, do a dry run.

The boogey man for lamination is creep, e.g. the lams start to slide to one side or another when you put them together. If this happens, your piece will be twisted. You can avoid it by putting battens (covered with plastic tape) sticking out from your form.

Sorry this is so long and boring. PM me if I can help.
Attached Thumbnails
planer-recommendation-fir-strips-lams.jpg  

Last edited by jessecloud; 12-23-2011 at 01:29 AM.
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Old 12-23-2011, 01:33 AM
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Default Re: planer recommendation for fir strips

I have to echo Okami that the Lee Valley (Veritas) bevel-up jack is a great plane. It'll work great for your task. A smoother would also work well. But I'm not sure Woodcraft carries LV. I'd go for a nice Lie Nielsen plane - their bevel-up jack is narrower than the LV, and a bit shorter, but a wonderful plane. Might actually work better for your task than the LV. But don't waste your money on a bad plane - it'll be more frustrating than useful. Get one with a thick blade, a thick chip breaker (on the bevel-down), and little backlash in the adjustment mechanism. The up-front cost is definitely worth it in the long run.

If you haven't used hand planes much, they can be very frustrating at first. It takes a little skill to ensure that the top and bottom faces of your board are parallel - there is a tendency to angle the plane to one side or other. Tear-out can drive you nuts on figured boards - a higher cutting angle will make a huge difference, as will a sharp blade.

Good luck!
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Old 12-23-2011, 01:41 AM
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Default Re: planer recommendation for fir strips

Jesse, I'd say you are up there with the wise men too!
Great post, very informative

Quote:
Originally Posted by jessecloud View Post
Sorry, but I can already tell this is going to be long. It hits several topics close to my heart.

First of all, since you are building trusses, check with the manufacturer of your glue to be sure it is capable of structural applications. Many of the glues discussed in this post are formulated for veneer or furniture grade loads, not to create load bearing trusses.

Poto is a wise man . Consider that noisy power planer. Yes you can do this with a handplane or a scraper, but it will take a longgg time. Also, in laminations, it is critical that the lam be extremely consistent in thickness. For instance, if you tend to cut a little deeper down the board than at the beginning, that difference will be multipled by the number of lams you are using. Say the end is 1/64 thinner than the beginning and you have ten lams, the result will be 10/64 thinner...

Springback is inversely proportional to the number of lams you have. A larger number of thinner lams will have less springback than fewer thicker lams. Depending on your application, you may not have to worry too much about springback as long as it is consistent from one piece to the next.

I make a lot of laminated furniture. I usually power plane the lams down to about 3/32 without problems. The straighter the grain the better. If you have knots or highly figured wood, expect to lose some pieces in the planer. Always do a dry bend to see if the lam will bend over your form without breaking - depends on the species, figure, knots, etc. etc.

If you chose a urea formaldehyde glue, please use a respirator while mixing - the powder is very unhealthy. And yes, it will smell. Give it a good airing before assembly.

If you have some extra strips, and you should, try and see if the 1/4 strip will bend over your form. If they do, just do that and use fewer, no need to plane them at all.

Titebond will work. I have used Titebond 1, 2 and 3 for lams. The main issue is working time. Three has a slightly longer working time. In any case, with titebond you will need to move fast. Have two or three helpers, do a dry run.

The boogey man for lamination is creep, e.g. the lams start to slide to one side or another when you put them together. If this happens, your piece will be twisted. You can avoid it by putting battens (covered with plastic tape) sticking out from your form.

Sorry this is so long and boring. PM me if I can help.
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