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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 08-18-2011, 05:21 PM
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Default Re: Limited Edition Cliftons

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Originally Posted by Poto View Post
This is certainly the way I heard it, Michael. I understood "proof" to mean a distilled liquor like rum. So I thought the phrase meant that the pudding had rum or brandy or something in it.

I'm at sea right now (literally - I'm on a research cruise), and the internet is slow enough that I can't check Wikipedia or anything. Maybe someone could check my interpretation for me?
That's a funny interpretation for a scientist.
The meaning of proof in this context is the same as in an experiment but it only makes sense if you use the full length version including the all important "is in the eating".

Obviously I looked it up finally. Here is the most amusing posting, from uRban DICTIONARY.


the proof is in the pudding

A phrase that, when uttered, instantly identifies the speaker as being incredibly stupid and illiterate.

The original saying is "the proof of the pudding is in the eating", basically meaning that something has to be experienced/utilized in order to prove how good it is.

This phrase got messed up by idiots who don't quite understand what they are saying.

Similar mistakes include could care less (couldn't care less), stop running around with your chicken cut off (stop running around like a chicken with its head cut off), begs the question (raises the question), here here (hear hear), and all that glitters is gold (all that glitters/glisters is not gold - "glisters" is used in the original Shakespeare quote)
REPUBLICAN: There's nothing bad about burning coal for energy! It's "clean coal!" The proof is in the pudding!

PROGRESSIVE: Whatever you say, dumbass.
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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 08-18-2011, 07:01 PM
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Default Re: Limited Edition Cliftons

I'm not sure I'd trust that post, Michael. They got the meaning of "begs the question" wrong. It means "avoids answering the question". Hmmm.
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Old 08-19-2011, 04:09 PM
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Default Re: Limited Edition Cliftons

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Originally Posted by Poto View Post

This is certainly the way I heard it, Michael. I understood "proof" to mean a distilled liquor like rum. So I thought the phrase meant that the pudding had rum or brandy or something in it.
Peter, interesting interpretation, but I could not find any mention of such a meaning anywhere else.

The consensus seems to be that "the proof of the pudding" is just another example of the many sayings that get twisted over the years to the point of making no sense. As we all know, nearly ANYTHING that gets repeated long enough is eventually accepted by the masses, whether it makes sense, or is based on any facts.

From the Word Dectective:

"At first glance, “the proof is in the pudding” seems thoroughly mysterious. What proof, in what pudding? Does this have anything to do with Colonel Mustard in the study with a candlestick? But the key to the mystery lies in the fact that “the proof is in the pudding” is actually a mangled form of the original phrase, which was “the proof of the pudding is in the eating.” A dish may have been made from a good recipe with fresh ingredients and look delicious, but you can really only judge it by putting it in your mouth. The actual taste is the only true criterion of success.

“The proof of the pudding is in the eating” is a very old phrase, dating back to at least 1605, and “proof” in the adage is an antiquated use of the word in the sense of “test” (also found in “printer’s proof,” a preliminary “test” copy of a book printed to check for errors, etc., before commencing a large print run). If you're wondering "why pudding?'' it's useful to know that puddings were held in much higher esteem at one time, so much so that there was another old saying that went, in part, "if a woman knows how to make a pudding, ... she knows enough for a wife.'' Husbands back then expected at least one pudding a day on the table. Even the eminent 18th-century literary figure Samuel Johnson saw fit to commend his friend, the poet and translator Elizabeth Carter, thus - "(she) could make a pudding as well as translate Epictetus from Greek ...'' Add to that the concealed nature of pudding ingredients - whether in a blood pudding or one of the traditional sweet puddings full of dried fruit and nuts and enclosed in a dumpling crust - and the logic behind the expression becomes far less mysterious.

Just how and why “the proof of the pudding is in the eating” was shortened to the semi-nonsensical “the proof is in the pudding” remains a mystery, but it’s worth noting that most people now interpret “proof” in the sense of “conclusive evidence.” That’s probably just as well, since “the test is in the pudding” would make, if possible, even less sense. In any case, “the proof is in the pudding” is hardly the only English idiom that doesn’t make any sense if read literally, and it certainly serves a useful purpose, even if it does sound like a cryptic clue from a Sherlock Holmes story."




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Old 08-19-2011, 05:17 PM
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Default Re: Limited Edition Cliftons

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Originally Posted by Okami View Post

I like the British green colour with the polished edges.
These are very solid weighty planes


Okami, very nice score!

I like the color too. With a little fine tuning I'm sure they'll perform well.


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Old 08-20-2011, 09:56 AM
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Default Re: Limited Edition Cliftons

Thanks John!

There wasn't much to tune up to be honest. I re-bevelled the blades from 25 to 30 degrees (to reach the "York Pitch") then polished the backs and put an edge on them, and I was in business. I think all the places that matter are about where they should be..nice users and I feel quite proud to have them in my woodshop
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Old 08-20-2011, 10:07 AM
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Default Re: Limited Edition Cliftons

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Originally Posted by PaulMarcel View Post
Really nice planes, Okami-sensei. Nice story to go with it all, too. Bet those 25 went in a hurry! How did you manage to get on the list for both of them?!
Thanks Paul!
I could have had my hands on a full set, but didn't have enough spare cash at the time, so just had these two. In the future I will try to get one here or there and finally get a full set. I'm quite sure some were bought by "holders" with the intention of re-selling them.
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 08-20-2011, 04:56 PM
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Default Re: Limited Edition Cliftons

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Originally Posted by Okami View Post
Thanks John!

There wasn't much to tune up to be honest. I re-bevelled the blades from 25 to 30 degrees (to reach the "York Pitch") then polished the backs and put an edge on them, and I was in business. I think all the places that matter are about where they should be..nice users and I feel quite proud to have them in my woodshop
Okamisan, it looks to me as though those planes are both bevel-downs. So I'm not clear on how any bevelling of the blade would change the cutting angle. Wouldn't it stay at the bed angle of the plane?
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 08-20-2011, 07:23 PM
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Default Re: Limited Edition Cliftons

Oops a daisy, You must be right Potosan!
Well then, these planes just needed the blades backs polishing and they were ready to go...the soles are flat out of the box...
The two piece cap iron is clever, to re-hone a micro bevel the whole cap iron doesn't need to be unscrewed and readjusted back on the blade..it's just a matter of taking the tip section off ( which sits in a rebate on the main body of the cap iron) and honing with the main part still in place
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