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Hand Planes Dedicated to the galoot's favorite tool - the hand plane.

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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2009, 05:28 AM
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Default Re: Anyone for a Sweet Heart???

Quote:
Originally Posted by joraft View Post
They're out of my reach too. I don't buy them, I just recommend that others do.

Then hopefully one day I'll know someone who owns one and I can hold it in my hands.
And a few moths later John is making curlies with a new Marcou
And here Iam doing a clean up on a 100 year old Stanley Bailey #5
Electrolysis.
Cheers!
Okami:tigersmile:
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Last edited by Okami; 09-10-2009 at 05:31 AM.
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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2009, 06:46 AM
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Default Re: Anyone for a Sweet Heart???

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Originally Posted by Okami View Post
Hello

Stanley have recently released their new versions of the old "sweethearts" hand planes.
1/8" thick A2 blades, adjustable mouths. Their low angle block is $99, looks ok for the price.
Who's gunna be the first to get one
Cheers!
Okami
I remember when Stanley had re-released a special edition bunch of similar classic tools around a dozen plus years ago for their anniversary back when they realized that there was a big collector market for their old planes and stuff.

I've downsized a lot, but still have too many of the originals, so I'm not interested in the newer repros.

For those that are interested, the originals are often much cheaper, except for some of the less common rare models. This weekend on Sunday here in New Jersey, a well known old tool collectors club called CRAFTS is having their annual picnic off Route 78 in Lamington. Besides their annual auction in April, it's known to attract the largest number of dealers with zillions of old tools, including many many old Stanley planes.

here's the information on their website...CRAFTS Picnic and tool sale

I have an 83 year old friend who introduced me to the club many years ago. He's been selling old tools for as long as I've know him, and he has a huge shop of old Delta machinery. I'll be helping him load up his van on Sunday morning. It'll be packed with tools, and he's always willing to negotiate a good bargain. So I'll probably go to the picnic on Sunday to hang out, but most of the stuff that I've been buying these past two years is Festool and woodturning related.
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  #13 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2009, 09:08 AM
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Default Re: Anyone for a Sweet Heart???

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Originally Posted by wdwrkr View Post
I remember when Stanley had re-released a special edition bunch of similar classic tools around a dozen plus years ago for their anniversary back when they realized that there was a big collector market for their old planes and stuff.

I've downsized a lot, but still have too many of the originals, so I'm not interested in the newer repros.

For those that are interested, the originals are often much cheaper, except for some of the less common rare models. This weekend on Sunday here in New Jersey, a well known old tool collectors club called CRAFTS is having their annual picnic off Route 78 in Lamington. Besides their annual auction in April, it's known to attract the largest number of dealers with zillions of old tools, including many many old Stanley planes.

here's the information on their website...CRAFTS Picnic and tool sale

I have an 83 year old friend who introduced me to the club many years ago. He's been selling old tools for as long as I've know him, and he has a huge shop of old Delta machinery. I'll be helping him load up his van on Sunday morning. It'll be packed with tools, and he's always willing to negotiate a good bargain. So I'll probably go to the picnic on Sunday to hang out, but most of the stuff that I've been buying these past two years is Festool and woodturning related.
So don't fail to take lots of pictures of the items you see.....
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Old 09-10-2009, 09:16 AM
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Default Re: Anyone for a Sweet Heart???

Quote:
Originally Posted by Okami View Post
And a few moths later John is making curlies with a new Marcou
And here Iam doing a clean up on a 100 year old Stanley Bailey #5
Electrolysis.
Cheers!
Okami:tigersmile:
Okami San,
You like to refurbish those Stanley types? Go here if you are interested for a selection -I did a number of them over the last few months, but in my own style ie made new knobs and handles, surface ground all over (quickest way to clean up and square them, spray etc ie make them work as they were intended but look good too. Picasa Web Albums - philip - Stanley type ...
Electrolysis?? Ya gotta keep that rust together with new paint otherwise the elektrickery will dissolve the whole plane
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  #15 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2009, 12:32 PM
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Default Re: Anyone for a Sweet Heart???

Thanks for the Info Wdwrkr, that sounds like my kind of day Too far for Me to travel though...

Philip,
Thanks for the link, I really like that No.7 at the beginning What wood is that, You've used?
Is the green paint on that other plane, Hammerite?
I'd rather have nice new planes, but with the way things are, I take what I can get...and I quite like cleaning and tuning them up in my spare time.
A tuned up Bailey is a nice user, although the planes You make are just a world apart

Cheers!
Okami:tigersmile:
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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2009, 05:50 PM
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Default Re: Anyone for a Sweet Heart???

.

Regarding Stanley Planes, here's a recent review by Chris S. on the Stanley 62 ....... Woodworking blog Woodworking Magazine - Review: Stanley No. 62

.
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2009, 09:19 PM
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Default Re: Anyone for a Sweet Heart???

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Originally Posted by RogerSavatteri View Post
.

Regarding Stanley Planes, here's a recent review by Chris S. on the Stanley 62 ....... Woodworking blog Woodworking Magazine - Review: Stanley No. 62

.
Roger, Thanks for the link, that was a very interesting read. Stanley quality is still not at the pre-WWII level when they focused on the professional market. Too bad a company could get so big, that they miss the basics, because everything is about the bottom line. The marketing people that push this crap are not woodworkers themselves. After WWII Stanley really started cutting costs to increase their profit margins, until eventually they were peddling junk. One of the big reasons the old tool market developed in the early days wasn't just for collecting, but also for the users who realized the quality in the original pre-WWII products that Stanley produced. Early dealer listing from the 70's & 80's often rated the tools in their descriptions based on their usability.

I bought the LN version #62 over a dozen years ago, and it was a high quality plane back then. I've seen many original Stanley #62's, and probably around 30-40% of them had the casting cracked behind the iron. That was also a common problem for many of Stanley's low-angle block planes, like the #65, and the #97 edge plane that LN also copied. The #62 is really based on Stanley's low angle block plane design, which all basically also share the adjustable mouth feature.

Often it's not a problem as a user plane if it's just a small chip. For a used plane a casting chip effects the price, and is a good way to get a good user block plane cheap. I am looking at a pair of knuckle cap #65 block planes right now, one mint, and the other is a "user" with two small chips in the casting behind the blade. The chips are 1/8" and 3/16". I could soften them with a file if they were leaving a mark on the wood. Otherwise, the casting chips are small enough not to impact performance other then some saw dust packing in there after awhile.

Another really nice block plane is the Stanley #60 and #60 1/2 which are smaller then most at 6" with a 1 3/8" blade. It's low angle with the adjustable mouth, and fits easily into a pocket when moving around the shop. Good ones are often under $50 for one of the better block planes that Stanley made.

Thanks, this thread brought back some memories.
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 09-11-2009, 10:32 AM
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Default Re: Anyone for a Sweet Heart???

Quote:
Originally Posted by Okami View Post
Thanks for the Info Wdwrkr, that sounds like my kind of day Too far for Me to travel though...

Philip,
Thanks for the link, I really like that No.7 at the beginning What wood is that, You've used?
Is the green paint on that other plane, Hammerite?
I'd rather have nice new planes, but with the way things are, I take what I can get...and I quite like cleaning and tuning them up in my spare time.
A tuned up Bailey is a nice user, although the planes You make are just a world apart

Cheers!
Okami:tigersmile:
Okami,
That wood on the #7 is a New Zealand wood- nice and hard, very heavy, called Black Maire (Olea Cunninghami). I was given some small amounts- very difficult to get hold of.
I spray them with Hammerite-excellent because it is an undercoat anti rust and top coat all in one.
If there is enough interest I can explain to the forum a few simple points on these planes that , when attended to, make a lot of difference to the way they work- and I don't mean going overboard with flattening them.
Meanwhile I would also like to point out that I think the belief that "pre WW2" Stanleys are superior to those made after that era is misleading- it may be true in some cases but not generally true , and I base that view on having "pimped up" about 100 of them since I have been in New Zee. In fact , some of the worst examples of faulty castings, holes not threaded to depth etc have been older American examples. I think it best to examine each example on its own and not worry about when it was made.
The agonising thing about Stanley is that as soon as they take two steps forward they also manage to go three steps backward eg coming up with a good grade of cast iron then instead of machining it they use rough belt grinding methods to "square" them up.
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 09-11-2009, 03:38 PM
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Default Re: Anyone for a Sweet Heart???

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Originally Posted by Philip Marcou View Post
Okami,
That wood on the #7 is a New Zealand wood- nice and hard, very heavy, called Black Maire (Olea Cunninghami). I was given some small amounts- very difficult to get hold of.
I spray them with Hammerite-excellent because it is an undercoat anti rust and top coat all in one.
If there is enough interest I can explain to the forum a few simple points on these planes that , when attended to, make a lot of difference to the way they work- and I don't mean going overboard with flattening them.
Meanwhile I would also like to point out that I think the belief that "pre WW2" Stanleys are superior to those made after that era is misleading- it may be true in some cases but not generally true , and I base that view on having "pimped up" about 100 of them since I have been in New Zee. In fact , some of the worst examples of faulty castings, holes not threaded to depth etc have been older American examples. I think it best to examine each example on its own and not worry about when it was made.
The agonising thing about Stanley is that as soon as they take two steps forward they also manage to go three steps backward eg coming up with a good grade of cast iron then instead of machining it they use rough belt grinding methods to "square" them up.
Hi Philip,

I would be very interested to read about the tweaking You do on these Stanley's
That Black Maire looks nice, ain't nothing like that around these parts!
That's good advice about examining each example, instead of just looking for a date of manufacture.
Cheers!
Okami
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 09-11-2009, 03:50 PM
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Default Re: Anyone for a Sweet Heart???

I'd also like to hear about the pimping of the old planes, if you would take the time, Philip.
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