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Old 07-14-2009, 07:39 PM
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Default Not my jig: Making circles without a lathe

This is lovingly referred to as the "Koko Jig" in honor of the guy that first posted it on the internet... For drum building hobbyists it's a way to get pretty darn round cylinders without the need of an expensive lathe.













Pictures are pretty self explanatory... I'm not sure if you'll ever have a need for it but who knows... might get gears turning in someones head.

I guess I could have posted this in the Festool Tips/Techniques forum with that particular router in the photos
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Old 07-14-2009, 07:52 PM
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Default Re: Not my jig: Making circles without a lathe

Actually this probably belongs in the general tips section... Can I get a move?
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Old 07-14-2009, 08:24 PM
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Default Re: Not my jig: Making circles without a lathe

That is cool! Do you use a jigsaw to do the initial waste removal for the inside circles?
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Old 07-14-2009, 09:24 PM
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Default Re: Not my jig: Making circles without a lathe

The guy gets an "A" for putting a lot of thought into it.

Last edited by RONWEN; 07-19-2009 at 12:00 PM.
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Old 07-14-2009, 09:37 PM
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Default Re: Not my jig: Making circles without a lathe

When doing an inside diameter, wouldn't having the router aligned as it is (axis of the bit perpendicular, more or less, to the work) result in a slightly concave inner surface?

Ned
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Old 07-14-2009, 11:15 PM
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Default Re: Not my jig: Making circles without a lathe

Ned: The router bit is hitting the shell at a fixed point while the shell is rotated by hand... Because you're always hitting a fixed height as you slide the router back and forth you won't get a concave surface.

Ronwen: By mostly in round I'm talking within 1/32 or so with the jig properly aligned... A machinists lathe does a better job and leaves less marks to sand off later. I think this is a much more elegant solution to trying to secure the shell flat and rotate the router around the work piece. You'd be fighting gravity trying to lathe from one side of the shell to the other... In fact this particular setup lends itself to attach a motor and spin the shell by mechanical means while you handle the router part.

Michael: I've cut MDF circles with a few multiple passes with a circle jig on the router... Takes a little while to cut through 3/4" mdf with a small bit but it's not too bad. Probably would save time to rough cut it with a jigsaw though now that I think about it.

I don't have my jig built yet but it's going to be coming soon. Instead of MDF I'm using pretty high strength maple 3/4" plywood. It's a little stiffer which should yield more consistant results for me.
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Old 07-15-2009, 03:10 AM
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Default Re: Not my jig: Making circles without a lathe

OK, like I say I'm slow today but I see what you are doing.

You start with "rough" wood cylinders of various diameters & what appears to be maybe 8"-10" high, then the idea is to "mill" them on both the O.D. and the I.D. to a close finished & consistent size.

How are the cylinders typically made? Bent wood or glued up segments to form the cylinder? I guess it's possible that some are made from a solid block of wood?
I imagine that building a simple lathe similar to what bowl turners use that would be large enough for the bigger drums would get a little too expensive. I used to have some machine tools (I sold) including an 18" swing lathe but even that would probably be too small for the larger drums?
When building a drum what makes it a good sounding drum? Does some of the tone come from the wood similar to other musical instruments?
Interesting business or hobby you have there!
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Old 07-15-2009, 04:17 AM
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Default Re: Not my jig: Making circles without a lathe

.


Mr. McDrum,,,,,,

Thank you for the interesting posting of that jig........my gears are already moving!


Ronwen,

You might take a look at this thread's pictures I found after I did a little searching on "Kokos Jig",,,,, scroll down a little,,,,,, pictures are pretty self explanatory.

first stave drum with koko jig - DrumShed - Embracing Drum Builders WorldWide!

cheers
,,,,r


.
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Old 07-15-2009, 05:17 AM
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Default Re: Not my jig: Making circles without a lathe

Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerSavatteri View Post
.


Mr. McDrum,,,,,,

Thank you for the interesting posting of that jig........my gears are already moving!


Ronwen,

You might take a look at this thread's pictures I found after I did a little searching on "Kokos Jig",,,,, scroll down a little,,,,,, pictures are pretty self explanatory.

first stave drum with koko jig - DrumShed - Embracing Drum Builders WorldWide!

cheers
,,,,r


.
Ahhhh Haaaa, Thanks for that Roger. Very interesting & as you say the wheels started turning on other applications aside from drums.

By the way Mr. McDrum () -- Roger would be a great source of knowledge on using your new Jointmaker Pro for making the drum segments. As you have said, it sounds like it may be way too much good exercise doing them that way but I'm sure that Roger has thoughts on it.
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Old 07-15-2009, 11:29 AM
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Default Re: Not my jig: Making circles without a lathe

I'd say 13" and 14" cylinders are the standard size drums you'd see being made on a jig like this. Those little 8" and 10" guys are going to be tough unless you have a very small router. As you said, lathes that can turn big diameters tend to get not only expensive but would probably crack the foundation under my house

There are several different methods of building a drum shell... steambent is probably the least likely to be found being built by a hobbyist. More likely you'd see a stave drum or segment. (If you want to see drum and joint mastery check out Conception Unix My french canadian friend is pretty much the best drum builder breathing...) Staves are built just like the name implies, in the manner of a stave barrel with the grain running vertical on the blocks of wood. A segment shell is built by stacking up rings until you get the height you need. Stronger configuration this way since you have a lot more glue and the grain is reinforced more.

As for woods... maple is still the dominant wood in the drum world. Bubinga is all the rage these days but I still vote for Cherry. Nowadays people use everything from Alder to Zebrawood though. Depends on the sound ya want.
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