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-   -   Edge grain/ end grain transition (http://www.talkfestool.com/vb/finishing/2541-edge-grain-end-grain-transition.html)

JayKnoll 10-08-2009 04:51 PM

Edge grain/ end grain transition
 
Hi everyone

Finishing isn't my strong suit so I could use some advice.

As you can see from the pic, the transition from the leg to the spreader on the desk results in some end grain showing. I gave it a quick alcohol wipe to check how I was doing on sanding. I don't like the darker end grain -- I knew it was a possibility but wasn't sure how prominent it would be.
Attachment 2493


So, should I put a wash of white glue and water on the area (50%/50%) and then re-sand? I'm planning on a wipe on varnish finish.

Thanks for the help

Jay

Poto 10-08-2009 05:13 PM

Re: Edge grain/ end grain transition
 
I have that same transition on most of my pieces. I like the way it enhances the joinery. If you've got a nice joint... Bang Head

No advice on making it disappear - sorry.

MichaelKellough 10-08-2009 05:45 PM

Re: Edge grain/ end grain transition
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by JayKnoll (Post 35098)
Hi everyone

Finishing isn't my strong suit so I could use some advice.

As you can see from the pic, the transition from the leg to the spreader on the desk results in some end grain showing. I gave it a quick alcohol wipe to check how I was doing on sanding. I don't like the darker end grain -- I knew it was a possibility but wasn't sure how prominent it would be.
Attachment 2493


So, should I put a wash of white glue and water on the area (50%/50%) and then re-sand? I'm planning on a wipe on varnish finish.

Thanks for the help

Jay

I've never tried to do that but your idea seems to be in the right area of exploration. Grab some scrap and test. Might take 2 or 3 coats but I'm not at all sure it won't darken the grain too. It isn't only the greater absorption of end grain that causes it to be darker, that might not even be the primary reason. Think of what happens when you put a puddle of liquid (or even clear adhesive tape) on sandblasted glass, you radically alter how much light diffraction occurs on the surface. In the case of end grain it might result in un-obscuring the fact that you're looking at a tight cluster of wells going into the wood. The fact that the wells can also fill up with dark colored finish is why your white glue idea sounds good.


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