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-   -   Some oil finish info (http://www.talkfestool.com/vb/finishing/2460-some-oil-finish-info.html)

MichaelKellough 09-20-2009 06:46 PM

Some oil finish info
 
We've talked about Tung oil and it's bastardization a few times before and I found a page of good info posted by a very experienced turner.

Poto 09-20-2009 07:52 PM

Re: Some oil finish info
 
That's a great link and source of information, Michael. Thanks!

:offtopic: I'm working on a cutting board right now - what would you put on it (food safe)?

MichaelKellough 09-20-2009 10:42 PM

Re: Some oil finish info
 
Tung oil, walnut oil, and mineral oil are all good/safe for cutting boards, I think. I'm sure you'll confirm elsewhere first.

Poto 09-21-2009 01:52 AM

Re: Some oil finish info
 
In that link they made the point that mineral oil is basically refined motor oil. They implied (without saying) that maybe you wouldn't want it on your cutting board...

Maybe some olive oil...

ecofurniture 09-21-2009 02:16 AM

Re: Some oil finish info
 
Olive oil will go bad... I would recommend Hemp oil or pure linseed oil.

joraft 09-21-2009 02:37 AM

Re: Some oil finish info
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Poto (Post 33199)

In that link they made the point that mineral oil is basically refined motor oil. They implied (without saying) that maybe you wouldn't want it on your cutting board...

Maybe some olive oil...

I've been using mineral oil on my boards for years.

And there's nothing wrong with me! :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

Seriously, it's sold in pharmacies as a laxative. How bad could it be when applied as a thin film on a cutting board?

MichaelKellough 09-21-2009 02:43 AM

Re: Some oil finish info
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ecofurniture (Post 33201)
Olive oil will go bad... I would recommend Hemp oil or pure linseed oil.

Do you mean un boiled linseed oil? As in Raw linseed oil? How long does that take to dry? Not that mineral oil dries either.

ecofurniture 09-21-2009 03:01 AM

Re: Some oil finish info
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelKellough (Post 33205)
Do you mean un boiled linseed oil? As in Raw linseed oil? How long does that take to dry? Not that mineral oil dries either.

It will take a couple of days to dry... Make sure to only apply a very thin coat!

"processed oils" all have some dryer additives in them, most of them contain heavy metals and other nasty stuff. I would certainly not want to have that touching my food!

Therefore only pure oils will be suitable for contact with food. BTW, don't trust the label "FDA approved"... they have proven them self over and over again to be wrong:(

Wonderwino 09-22-2009 04:11 AM

Re: Some oil finish info
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by joraft (Post 33204)
I've been using mineral oil on my boards for years.

And there's nothing wrong with me! :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

Seriously, it's sold in pharmacies as a laxative. How bad could it be when applied as a thin film on a cutting board?

I guess every time you dice up a salad, you get the Overnight Wonder... :rofl: :laughing1: :laughing1: :laughing1: :rofl:

joraft 09-22-2009 03:43 PM

Re: Some oil finish info
 
Mineral oil's ability to prevent water absorption, combined with its lack of flavor and odor, make it a popular preservative for wooden cutting boards, salad bowls and utensils. Rubbing a small amount of mineral oil into a wooden kitchen item periodically will prevent absorption of food odors and ease cleaning, as well as maintain the integrity of the wood, which is otherwise subjected to repeated wetting and drying in the course of use. The oil fills small surface cracks that may otherwise harbor bacteria.

It is occasionally used in the food industry, particularly for candy. In this application, it is typically used for the glossy effect it produces, and to prevent the candy pieces from adhering to each other. It has been discouraged for use in children's foods, though it is still found in many candies, including the popular movie theater treat Swedish Fish.

It can be used as a release agent for baking pans and trays, but food oils like vegetable oil are a more popular choice.

Mineral oil is also often used as a coating on metal tools and weapons, knives in particular, as a way to inhibit oxidation. The Japanese swords Nihonto, for example, are traditionally coated in Choji oil which consists of 99% mineral oil and 1% oil of cloves. The use of oil of cloves is sometimes explained as a means of differentiating sword oil from cooking oil to prevent accidental ingestion, but may also be purely aesthetic.

Mineral oil can be used as a leather conditioner as well, though most shoe polishes use naphtha, lanolin, turpentine and Carnauba wax instead.

It can also be used as a wood preservative. A light coating of mineral oil, rubbed into well-sanded wood, provides an easy-to-apply and relatively durable finish, without the odor or drying time (or toxicity) of varnish or urethane.


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