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Festool Tips and Techniques Tips on using your Festools

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Old 03-04-2013, 06:11 PM
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Default hard felt / pore filler

Just something I tried and was really happy with. I had tabletop sections to refinish, and if you've ever used pore filler, sometimes getting it off can be a real chore.
Side note- man after trying Constantines I never want to look farther. SO much better than anything else I've tried before.
But anyway
So put it on, squeegee, burlap lightly, let haze, burlap a little more.
Then I thought you know, I have a pile of hard felt pads for the RO150, so I put one on, speed at 4, mode at rotary. Wow that did a great job of cleaning up the final bit.
Cleaning the pad when it got loaded I just held a piece of 80 grit heavy paper on it for a few seconds.
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Old 03-04-2013, 06:36 PM
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Default Re: hard felt / pore filler

Good tip; I forget about the felt pads sometimes.
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Old 03-05-2013, 03:36 AM
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Default Re: hard felt / pore filler

I often use those felt pads for the last pass when finishing. I'm not convinced they do a whole lot, but they somehow make me feel better about it!

I hadn't thought to clean them up with sandpaper. Great idea, Randy!
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Old 03-05-2013, 06:16 AM
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Default Re: hard felt / pore filler

All the ones I've used so far I keep them as long as they're intact in ziploc bags and labeled for which grit I've used on them, except rottenstone. That one's pretty visually obvious.
I've used the foam ones as well with automotive compounds. They do pretty good if its a smaller project. Otherwise I have a 7" rotary buffer.
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Old 03-05-2013, 02:43 PM
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Default Re: hard felt / pore filler

Peter said, "I often use those felt pads for the last pass when finishing. I'm not convinced they do a whole lot,"

Randy keeps them "labeled for which grit I've used on them,"

These pads are something I don't know much about either but I don't think they'll do much by themselves. I think you have to add some polishing compound. Is that what you do Randy?

Also, can you share more info on that pore filler from Constantine's?
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Old 03-05-2013, 06:47 PM
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Default Re: hard felt / pore filler

www.constatines.com
Soft pad is 485972, Hard felt pad is 485970, just in case you were wondering....
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Old 03-05-2013, 08:20 PM
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Default Re: hard felt / pore filler

Ok. Constantines pore filler is an oil base. It dries slower than the water bases I've tried, which is not to say it's slow. It almost gives you enough time to work with it. Some fillers don't seem to really fill very well without multiple coats. C's is about a 95% guarantee you'll be happy after 1 application.
The haze removes easier than many I've tried. That tends to be a bigger deal than you'd think. You can break a good sweat with some of them, which really is just annoying. Kind of deal where you say to yourself this shouldn't be this hard.
After that, not sure what to add. I like it. I've tried several. It's way ahead of Bartleys or Behlen/Mohawk, the crystalcrack stuff...

felt pads are polishing pads. They're more or less intended to be used with some kind of abrasive agent. What pad you choose is decided by how abrasive you want to be, what you're polishing, etc.
Pads, for a rotary polisher, a buffing motor, whatever, vary from cottons, flannel, sisal, different densities of felt, foams, wool...
On a flat surface you'd want a dense flat pad. Too soft and you'll roll over the edges. Felt is universally a great material for holding abrasive compounds. Many of the foam pads work well too.

The abrasives I am referring to in my grit comment are like pumice and rottenstone, dry abrasives you lube with oil when you polish. After those, in progression, I switch to automotive compounds which seem to work just fine on wood finishes.

Hypothetically, if I'm rubbing out a finish on a table top, the grit progression might look like 400, 600 (wet/dry paper) Med pumice, fine pumice, rottenstone, switch to automotive Fine cut cleaner, swirl remover
You can go further with glazes but there's no cutting action, they're cosmetic.

Foam pads clean pretty easily, and are cheap. They're good for middle of the road abrasives, and curves (like a boat). Sisal is coarse and aggressive. If you need to take scale off metal.
All that said, I'd tell you to take what I know with a grain of salt. For all the polishing I've done, it's like anything else. The farther you go, the less you know. I feel like I probably really only know about 2% of the information that's really out there.
I'm only good at it on the things that I work on. That being, wood finishes.
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Old 03-06-2013, 02:46 PM
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Default Re: hard felt / pore filler

Quote:
Originally Posted by RWeber View Post
Ok. Constantines pore filler is an oil base. It dries slower than the water bases I've tried, which is not to say it's slow. It almost gives you enough time to work with it. Some fillers don't seem to really fill very well without multiple coats. C's is about a 95% guarantee you'll be happy after 1 application.
The haze removes easier than many I've tried. That tends to be a bigger deal than you'd think. You can break a good sweat with some of them, which really is just annoying. Kind of deal where you say to yourself this shouldn't be this hard.
After that, not sure what to add. I like it. I've tried several. It's way ahead of Bartleys or Behlen/Mohawk, the crystalcrack stuff...

felt pads are polishing pads. They're more or less intended to be used with some kind of abrasive agent. What pad you choose is decided by how abrasive you want to be, what you're polishing, etc.
Pads, for a rotary polisher, a buffing motor, whatever, vary from cottons, flannel, sisal, different densities of felt, foams, wool...
On a flat surface you'd want a dense flat pad. Too soft and you'll roll over the edges. Felt is universally a great material for holding abrasive compounds. Many of the foam pads work well too.

The abrasives I am referring to in my grit comment are like pumice and rottenstone, dry abrasives you lube with oil when you polish. After those, in progression, I switch to automotive compounds which seem to work just fine on wood finishes.

Hypothetically, if I'm rubbing out a finish on a table top, the grit progression might look like 400, 600 (wet/dry paper) Med pumice, fine pumice, rottenstone, switch to automotive Fine cut cleaner, swirl remover
You can go further with glazes but there's no cutting action, they're cosmetic.

Foam pads clean pretty easily, and are cheap. They're good for middle of the road abrasives, and curves (like a boat). Sisal is coarse and aggressive. If you need to take scale off metal.
All that said, I'd tell you to take what I know with a grain of salt. For all the polishing I've done, it's like anything else. The farther you go, the less you know. I feel like I probably really only know about 2% of the information that's really out there.
I'm only good at it on the things that I work on. That being, wood finishes.
Thanks for all the great info. I hadn't bought any of the Felt Pads since I was fine with either Foam Pads for polishing or Vlies if I'm using my Surfix or other oil as a finish for wood.
Now I have to try one on oil or something else with any of the various compounds I've got[or ye old Rottenstone and Pumice too...].
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Old 03-07-2013, 03:22 AM
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Default Re: hard felt / pore filler

If you want to save a buck, there's no sense in spending $15 on a bottle of someone's proprietary rubbing oil. Go to the supermarket and get a bottle of mineral oil for a buck fifty. Cut it down about a third with mineral spirits. Dispense from a plastic bottle. All you're giving up is a label and a little perfume.
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Old 03-07-2013, 01:40 PM
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Default Re: hard felt / pore filler

Quote:
Originally Posted by RWeber View Post
If you want to save a buck, there's no sense in spending $15 on a bottle of someone's proprietary rubbing oil. Go to the supermarket and get a bottle of mineral oil for a buck fifty. Cut it down about a third with mineral spirits. Dispense from a plastic bottle. All you're giving up is a label and a little perfume.
Hmm, have to disagree with that one. Whatever Festool managed to get into the various Surfix oils is different in applying and drying than anything else I've used or mixed up.
VERY low odor[great for indoor work] and VERY fast drying time with good penetration. I will say however that the Outdoor oil has not held up against Lignin damage any better than a number of products that I've tried. If anyone remembers, I posted a trial batch of different "outdoor" oils and finishes, Cedar slats all in a cute row. Well, it's going on almost a year now, so it's time to bring the sample Cedar back into the shop and take an 'After' picture.
Vertically, the wood looks decent, but, all the horizontal strips are grey as I figured they woould be if the touted UV protection was not-all-that...
Back to the Oil as a finish. Last year, I sent POTO some Cherry Strips that I had applied plain Tung Oil[with no mineral spirits added] and Festool One Step Oil as a test.
The first thing that jumped out was that the Tung Oil was easily removed during the sanding and burnishing stages. The One Step Oil from Festool got into the wood and stayed there, as you lost very little product when compared to the Tung Oil. This saved sandpaper and Vlies since I could get more usage out of each 6"/150mm piece.
Later, I went back and tried cutting the Tung Oil with Mineral Spirits to see if the Tung Oil would fare a bit better when compared to the Festool Oils in the Surfix Kit.
Penetration WAS better, drying time however was still no where as fast as the Festool Finishes, and the out gassing of the Mineral Spirits was, um, noticeable..
So, after a year of living with my Surfix Kit, the only thing I can truly knock it for is poor UV protection when using the Outdoor Oil that was some how supposed to have UV protection in it[OK, I NEVER REALLY believed it would hold up], but making all those Cedar Strips and applying the 5 or so different finishes was fun.

I'm not heavy into oil finshes like POTO or AusRob, but I am warming up to them since using the Surfix Kit really changed the results I get and clean-up, storage, and general ease of usage are different than the way I used to use Oil Finishes..
I love my Epifanes though.......
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