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Old 07-28-2008, 09:22 PM
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Default Walko, MFT Holes: Bench Dogs

Bench Dogs

To start, we need some pegs or bench dogs that will fit inside the holes in the MDF top. These can be a true bench dog, a wooden dowel, a 20 mm bolt, the "stop" from the clamping elements, a piece of European 20 mm PVC used by electricians, or anything else you can up with that fit the holes.


From the top left and going clockwise, this picture shows a Rockler Bench Dog, Festool Clamping Element Stop, 20 mm Bolt, 20 mm diameter scrap piece of metal.


Here is the 20 mm PVC pipe being used as a bench dog.

Black & Decker 79-010-4 “Workmate Swivel Grip Peg” fit the holes good, especially after clipping off the tabs that are used to lock the dogs in the holes.



I had a friend with a machine shop make up this bench dog:




Aligning The Guide Rail

Take 2 bench dogs and stick them in a row of vertical holes just to the left of the guide rail.

Try to space out the dogs, one at the bottom, and one near the top for better accuracy. The farther apart the dogs, the better your accuracy.

Now slide the guide rail up against the bench dogs. Make sure the rail is locked into the alignment pin on the front bracket. Secure the thumb screws on the guide rail brackets that slide in the slots on the table's side.

It is now aligned and ready for use.

You will find the left side of the guide rail is easier to align with than using the right side with the rubber strip. It is also just as accurate.

The Guide Rail alignment is that easy. No wiggling, wrestling with a square, no double or triple checking to see if anything bumped. Just make sure the guide rail was locked in the little pin on it’s front bracket. And be sure to tighten the thumb screws on the guide rail clamp to prevent the clamps from moving.





Cross Cuts

Make sure you have aligned the guide rail as stated above. Put your bench dogs into a row of horizontal holes. The top edge of your workpiece will rest on these so space accordingly. If your bench dogs are lower than the board's thickness, you can use a hole under the guide rail.

You do not need to use a row of holes near the top. As long as your board will fit on the table, you can use the bench dogs in the middle horizontal row of the table. No need to stretch while making a crosscut on narrow stock.

Put your board in place against the bench dogs and under the guide rail. Slide the board to align your cutting mark. Hold the board firmly against the bench dogs and cut as you normally would.

No squares or tools are needed. Align the rail, move the bench dogs, bring your board in place, and cut. That is all there is to it.





45 Degree Miter Cut

Make sure you have aligned the guide rail as stated above. Insert your bench dogs into a diagonal row of holes (you know, 1 up and 1 over, or 1 down and 1 over). Space your bench dogs out and use as much of the table as possible. Push your board against the bench dogs and under the guide rail. Make your cut.




Parallel Cuts

I can now use bench dogs in a vertical row of holes as a board stop and get a perfect parallel cut. Simply slide the guide rail down to where the cut needs to be made using the speed square.

Here is a great idea form Peter Franks, aka Poto. If you buy a set of Veritas Wonder Dogs you can use these as move-able dogs and for fine tuning your guide for the workpiece. The Lee Valley Wonder Dogs are really useful for making large or small lateral adjustments in the piece parallel to the guide rail...

Last edited by Qwas; 08-05-2008 at 04:23 PM.
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Old 07-28-2008, 09:37 PM
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Steve,

Nice "dog" and pony show!

One question about the B&D dogs... Do those fit tight?

Thanks,

Dan.
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Old 07-28-2008, 09:43 PM
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I don't have a set but I've been told from a reliable source (Nickao) that fit tight with the tabs on. After cutting off the tabs they fit snug but are easier to turn.
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Old 07-28-2008, 09:45 PM
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Steve,

Cool! I'll give mine a try.

Thanks,

Dan.
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Old 07-31-2008, 04:28 AM
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I received a message today from an African friend with the following useful information:

" I tried 20 mm pvc conduit pipe as bench dogs but found they fit too loose. After searching and experimenting with a lot of different materials I narrowed it down to 2.

1. Nylon 20 mm irrigation pipe connectors they where innitialy too tight butt then I made 4 band saw kerfs in them and now they work perfectly.

2. 20 mm anchor bolts or rawl bolts. These are used to anchor heavy materials in solid walls. The bolt itself (m12) sits in a sleeve consisting of two pieces attached to each other as you tighten the bolt a wedge a conical or wedge shaped nut moves up in the sleeve and forces it to expand. This makes a very tight fit and is ideal for jigs as it can be made unmoveable and can be loosened again. They are 90 mm long."
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Old 08-27-2008, 03:16 AM
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Default Re: Walko, MFT Holes: Bench Dogs

It is time to start making some 20 mm bench dogs made out of aluminum. It seems no one else wants to.




Check out my thread on this product located here

Last edited by Qwas; 02-26-2009 at 04:51 AM.
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Old 02-21-2009, 11:30 PM
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Default Re: Walko, MFT Holes: Bench Dogs

I'm the pround new owner of a MFT/3 table. I amazed at how handy this is going to be for me actually eliminating the need for other bigger benches.
I was just working through the process of squaring up the rail & protractor attachments and I found these threads on Quas Dogs. They would seem to be an outstanding tool for aligning the rails & cut materials making it easy to cut square and perpendicular edges. I intend to place an order.
My question is about the table board itself. It seems to be a good idea to protect it with a thin coat of polyurathane. The holes in my board average around 20.3 to 20.4MM. I'm thinking that even if the polyurathane closed up the holes a bit that I could buff them back out to a nice slip fit for the Quas dogs. What is the general thought on protecting the table? I guess the other approach could be to just go ahead & use it and if and when it becomes an unsatisfactory mess to buy a replacement top.
Thanks,
Ron
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Old 02-21-2009, 11:41 PM
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Default Re: Walko, MFT Holes: Bench Dogs

There are a few who have added protection to the top. Most of us have not.

I was going to but then I got to thinking about it. Unless the holes are completely coated, you still the run the risk of damage. I decided it would be too hard to coat every completely so I never did it.

My table is over 2 years old and I've had no problem with damage from water. My damage comes from tools, glue, paint, pencil marks...
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Old 02-25-2009, 07:31 PM
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Default Re: Walko, MFT Holes: Bench Dogs

Quote:
Originally Posted by RONWEN View Post
I'm the pround new owner of a MFT/3 table. I amazed at how handy this is going to be for me actually eliminating the need for other bigger benches.
I was just working through the process of squaring up the rail & protractor attachments and I found these threads on Quas Dogs. They would seem to be an outstanding tool for aligning the rails & cut materials making it easy to cut square and perpendicular edges. I intend to place an order.
My question is about the table board itself. It seems to be a good idea to protect it with a thin coat of polyurathane. The holes in my board average around 20.3 to 20.4MM. I'm thinking that even if the polyurathane closed up the holes a bit that I could buff them back out to a nice slip fit for the Quas dogs. What is the general thought on protecting the table? I guess the other approach could be to just go ahead & use it and if and when it becomes an unsatisfactory mess to buy a replacement top.
Thanks,
Ron
To save you my error . . . I was also concerned about protecting my top. I read on woodshopdemos.com that I should put a piece of polystyrene (or similar material) under the wood I was cutting. This was a very good idea but I foolishly went and bought several pieces of 2" think material. That caused all sorts of problems and it was not until recently (and more than a few cuts on the top) that I discovered I should have bought 1/4" (or so) thick pieces of polystyrene etc. I have found that the most convenient place to buy the stuff is at one of my spouse's craft stores like Joanne's or Michael's.

For protecting the top against other things (coffee, glue, etc.) I have used FRP for some time and it works well on the top of my MFT. It is impervious to most anything (which is why I lined the wall near the garage sink with it) and is cheap and readily available. Think of it as a placemat for the garage.
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Old 02-25-2009, 07:51 PM
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Default Re: Walko, MFT Holes: Bench Dogs

C,

Like you I tried the 2" insullation, but it was too thick. If the 1/4" stuff is white and looks like pressed beads, I tried that too, but found it too spongy.

I like the 1" pink extruded Polystyrene that I found at Homers. Here's a descriptive PDF: http://www.owenscorning.com/worldwid...Insulation.pdf. A couple of pieces will handle anything up to a 4X8 sheet of ply and should last you for a long time.

Regards,

Dan.
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Last edited by DanClark; 02-28-2009 at 02:00 AM. Reason: Link to Home Depot was broken
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