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Bridge City Tool Works For the past twenty-five years we have been producing innovative and impeccably crafted heirloom tools for serious woodworkers and collectors worldwide. Made in America, all of our tools are produced in limited numbers and with minimal care should continue to inspire your children's children. I believe the look, feel and accuracy of each Bridge City tool will always influence you to do your best work. Quality is contagious. Regards, John Economaki President & Founder

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  #51 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2010, 07:59 PM
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Default Re: Assembling the JMPv2

The way I "trued" 90* on mine:

I raised the blade to it's highest point. Loosen the two knobs that hold the trunions in place. I set my DSS6 in one side of the blade and a small square from woodpeckers on the other side. I held a light behind the squares and adjusted the trunions both sides were in perfect contact. Lock the knobs and move the pointer to 90*.

If you move the bevel angle, you should probably check square by this method anyway, just to be certain.
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  #52 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2010, 11:35 PM
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Default Re: Assembling the JMPv2

Hello,

A good starting point in setting pitch; is to start with no pitch and dial some in until the blade starts cutting when your stock is 2/3rds of the way into the stroke. I've found this to work well with domestic hardwoods, exotics need less pitch.

Yes, the teeth are below the table at the start of your sawing, but as you raise the blade after each stroke, the whole blade will be above the table and keep getting higher! Make it a HABIT to completely lower the blade when you've finished the cut so you don't accidently ram your next piece of un-cut stock into your fully raised blade!

Another technique that you can employ is moving the table back and forth in a sawing motion moving a bit farther with each movement, this can be handy if you inadvertently set the blade a little high, if its too high, lower it and work your way back up. Sometimes I'll run a couple of full strokes without raising the blade if I think I took too aggresive of a cut.

One thing that can't be repeated enough is: YOUR STOCK MUST NOT MOVE ON THE TABLE! If it moves, there's a good chance you'll be buying a new blade. A tip to help in clamping your stock is to: lightly tighten your trap clap against the stock/fence and then use a clamp to squeeze the trap clamp and the fence against your stock and then firmly tighten the trap clamp knob. The pictures show two types of clamps, almost any you own should work.

-Rutager
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assembling-jmpv2-clamp-001.jpg   assembling-jmpv2-clamp-002.jpg  
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  #53 (permalink)  
Old 12-11-2010, 05:24 AM
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Default Re: Assembling the JMPv2

@AlaskaRangerBorealis
For checking the squareness of the blade and setting the indicator, and this applies to ANY saw, it is always better to check the actual cut, and not just use a square against the blade.
For the JMP, we use 1/8" masonite or baltic birch ply. Set the blade at the steepest/maximum pitch possible. Put the masonite on edge against the fence and make a test cut. Check the cut with your square. Adjust if necessary. After you have determined square, be sure to put one of the Finger Stops at this setting. We have had great repeatability with the finger stops. Always have one for 90!


As I have told Roger, I believe bamboo has silica in it, like Teak. It destroys blades, and on top of the resin in the bamboo ply...you will be ordering lots of blades from us....


Also, AKRanger, the front teeth are below the table surface for the first cut. When you crank the handle the entire blade with raise up evenly.


In general, we always try to do a complete stroke of the blade. If you find in your first cut, that the pitch of the blade is too steep (too much resistance in the cut) then simply lower it. It is ok to change the pitch midway through cutting.

Let the blade do the work. If it takes you more than 1 push to get to the end of the blade you are working way to hard.



As Rutager said: ALWAYS LOWER THE BLADE AFTER CUTTING.
Have fun!
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  #54 (permalink)  
Old 12-11-2010, 06:10 AM
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Default Re: Assembling the JMPv2

Quote:
Originally Posted by joraft View Post
Sorry, wine's just gotta be from California, and whiskey's just gotta be from Tennessee.

Them's the rules.

John, I happen to live approx. 45 miles from the Jack Daniels Distillery. They offer tours, but I have yet to take them up on it. There is another Tennessee whiskey maker by the name of George Dickel. While I am sure it is a matter of taste, Jack Daniels just doesn't have as good a taste as George Dickel does.

I have to admit that seeing and reading about all of the Joint Makers here, I want one now, but how do I get it past the swmbo. As it is, I have already spent over $6000 this year on new camera gear (lenses and camera accessories from Really Right Stuff), plus I went to Woodcraft in Franklin, Tennessee and bought four Lie Neilson planes. Woodcraft (at least this one) is no longer carrying Lie Neilson tools, but they had several planes in stock, and discounted at 15% off retail price. I had to buy them just for this reason, and the fact that I still want to build a Roubo bench. I also bought two new Garmin gps units (both are the same model and are not cheap). There have been other things too, but all of that is included in the above mentioned money spent Maybe if I sell some of my other tools (which I do want to do, anyway), I could swing it.

Oh the decisions to be made.

Regards, Colin
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  #55 (permalink)  
Old 12-11-2010, 06:45 AM
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Default Re: Assembling the JMPv2

Thank you, Mike and all others.
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  #56 (permalink)  
Old 12-11-2010, 02:09 PM
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Default Re: Assembling the JMPv2

Tip,,,,,,

For those of you that are experimenting with cutting rips with the JMP,
I have found that carefully waxing the blade with a high grade canuba wax (and then buffing it out) helps cut down resistance on the blade.

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  #57 (permalink)  
Old 12-11-2010, 02:51 PM
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Default Re: Assembling the JMPv2

Another tip I picked from Roger last year: never "lose" the blade out of the kerf; when you draw the tables back, always leave the blade in the kerf, sticking out of the back of the fence. If you do lose it, just lower the blade and start over to recapture the blade.
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  #58 (permalink)  
Old 12-11-2010, 06:12 PM
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Default Re: Assembling the JMPv2

Has anyone yet figured out how to marry an Incra-style jig to the table, so that when one is trying to make a squigglewood-type incremental - and very repetitive - move of 2mm or so again and again and again - you can do it with absolute precision?
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  #59 (permalink)  
Old 12-11-2010, 07:08 PM
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Default Re: Assembling the JMPv2

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaRanger View Post
Has anyone yet figured out how to marry an Incra-style jig to the table, so that when one is trying to make a squigglewood-type incremental - and very repetitive - move of 2mm or so again and again and again - you can do it with absolute precision?
When I was up in Portland John had a neat trick, and I believe if you look at Michael's earlier videos he shows this - you'll see that he started with a stack of spacers to the right of the stock being cut against the fence (in this case he used a stack of BCTW rules and each time deleted a rule or two - since you probably don't have a bulk pack of BCTW rules handy any stack of 1/8" plexi or aluminum cut offs will do. It worked flawlessly.

(I'd research it and link the video clip, but I'm just peeking in and need to get back to my roof project)
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  #60 (permalink)  
Old 12-11-2010, 07:40 PM
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Default Re: Assembling the JMPv2

At the WIA John demonstrated making squigglewood to Peter and me. He just made a pencil line on the fence a little ways away from the kerf and then you would line up the last cut with the pencil line and so on. Not NASA accurate, but still pretty precise for most tasks.

-Rutager
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