talkFestool  

Go Back   talkFestool > Manufacturers & Vendors of Fine Tools > Bridge City Tool Works

Bridge City Tool Works For the past twenty-five years we have been producing innovative and impeccably crafted heirloom tools for serious woodworkers and collectors worldwide. Made in America, all of our tools are produced in limited numbers and with minimal care should continue to inspire your children's children. I believe the look, feel and accuracy of each Bridge City tool will always influence you to do your best work. Quality is contagious. Regards, John Economaki President & Founder

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #51 (permalink)  
Old 12-15-2009, 08:10 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 971
Default Re: Bridge City Toolworks "Jointmaker Pro Upgrade" Review . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wonderwino View Post
So, back to the JMP v2; Is there an index to set the angle of the cut to or do you just measure against the blade? I could not find this info at BCT.

It's always best to check the angle of the cut to the blade. That being said there is an angle index with flip down stops to set the Bevel angle(s) that you frequently use, once you set the curser to a cut at exactly 90 degrees. The swing either way is 45 degrees on the JMP-v1 and I believe that's the case on the JMP-v2. On the JMP-sw full swing will be the left way with a limited swing to the right.

For a more detailed view please refer to section 23 on the PDF of the JMP-v1 manual... http://www.bridgecitytools.com/files...Guide_rev2.pdf


.

Last edited by RogerSavatteri; 12-15-2009 at 08:35 PM.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #52 (permalink)  
Old 12-15-2009, 08:13 PM
MichaelKellough's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: The northernmost end of the southernmost county of New York
Posts: 4,504
Default Re: Bridge City Toolworks "Jointmaker Pro Upgrade" Review . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerSavatteri View Post
It's always best to check the angle of the cut to the blade. That being said there is an angle index with flip down stops to set an angle(s) that you frequently use, once you set the curser to a cut at exactly 90 degrees. The swing either way is 45 degrees on the JMP-v1 and I believe that's the case on the JMP-v2. On the JMP-sw full swing will be the left way with a limited swing to the right.

For a more detailed view please refer to section 23 on the PDF of the JMP-v1 manual... http://www.bridgecitytools.com/files...Guide_rev2.pdf


.
The above refers to setting the bevel angle. To set the miter angle you gauge from the fence to the blade, don't you?
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #53 (permalink)  
Old 12-15-2009, 08:33 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 971
Default Re: Bridge City Toolworks "Jointmaker Pro Upgrade" Review . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelKellough View Post
The above refers to setting the bevel angle. To set the miter angle you gauge from the fence to the blade, don't you?

Good point, he didn't specify, but I assumed he meant the bevel angle.
And you are correct - the angle for a Miter cut is from the edge of the fence to the blade. For repeatable angles you could take a pencil and scribe a line onto the orange tables.



ps. Michael - now why are you not using those observational powers on the Black Box Mystery! I gave one really good hint.
.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #54 (permalink)  
Old 12-15-2009, 09:34 PM
Wonderwino's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Grew up in Peekskill, NY; Now living in Northwest Kansas
Posts: 2,677
Default Re: Bridge City Toolworks "Jointmaker Pro Upgrade" Review . . .

I was referring to the miter angle - I just assumed the bevel angle was explained by the markings on the end plate. A pencil line on the plate would work for repeated setups until they rub off. I suppose a bevel tool with a scale could layout miters accuarately from the blade.

If the fence is all the way back to the stops on the tables, is it dead-on square to the blade?
__________________
Water separates the people of the world; wine unites them.

"If you have good manners and are well spoken, you can be welcome anywhere." -Mom, 1959
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #55 (permalink)  
Old 12-15-2009, 10:02 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 971
Default Re: Bridge City Toolworks "Jointmaker Pro Upgrade" Review . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wonderwino View Post

If the fence is all the way back to the stops on the tables, is it dead-on square to the blade?
No, there are adjustments fore and aft to adjust the blade carriage (Keel) for a square blade / back-fence set up.

See section 22 ... http://www.bridgecitytools.com/files...Guide_rev2.pdf



.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #56 (permalink)  
Old 12-16-2009, 07:54 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 971
Default Re: Bridge City Toolworks "Jointmaker Pro Upgrade" Review . . .

.

A General Review of the new Linear Tables for the Jointmaker Pro (JMPv2 & JMP Upgrade Kit) from Bridge City Tools

I’ll cut right to the point (perfect pun don’t you think?): I have been a Jointermaker Pro user since its introduction and was more than curious as to whether it’s worth the money to upgrade my Jointmaker Pro to the v2. Through this review you should be able to gain enough information to decide if the new JMP v2, the new JMP SW (single wing) or the upgrade kit is for you. I will not (at this time) bury you with details and insights to work methods, clamping set-ups (even if you see hints in the photos), nor will I repeat my review of the JMP from a year ago.

Note: Whenever I write JMP-v1, I am referring to the original JMP introduced about a year ago.

On the New Linear Rails . . .

Switching from the original dovetail system to the new ball bearing linear rails...

. . . is like the feeling you got from going uphill on a cruiser bike and then switching to a geared system bicycle.

. . . is like going cross-country skiing then switching to downhill skis.

. . . is like massage with oil as opposed to bare hands.

I think you get my point; they all get you to the same destination with less effort.

With that in mind it is important to note that the quality of the cuts between the two linear table systems is identical. Comparing a perfectly tuned JMP –v1 to the upgrade version you can’t help but notice that the inertia and reduced effort of the new linear slides makes the cutting experience feel “breezy”. There is an absence of drag with the linear slides that is inherent with the dovetail design. Especially when one travels the full length of the original ways - pushing through a cut, and then returning.

The new rails provide more momentum with less effort during the cut..



. . . . .

Cutting small stock or cutting shallow cuts on large stock, whether it be squiggle wood, cutting dovetails, joinery cuts or chamfer cuts – the inertia of the new rails makes this an easier operation. Where the new system really shines are lengthy sessions for all the above. There was not the same feeling of fatigue as with the dovetail system. That being said if you are just an occasional user and working with balsa like wood for architectural models I’m not quite convinced that you would need to upgrade.

I found for instance when I was cutting the ripped piece you see below it became a “breezy experience” … which on the dovetail system is usually a tedious process.



. . . . .
In the short time I’ve been using the upgrade I’m surprised at the robust quality of the linear rail system. There have been times in the past with the dovetail system where when you get a little ahead of yourself and you push the workpiece (trap clamped to the tables) into the blade; and the work piece and the blade become jammed. This then necessitates slowly backing the blade out and wiggling out the work piece, which sometimes leads to loosening the dovetail to table alignment – which then leads to having to recalibrate the tables. (An easy adjustment – but annoying interruption to one's workflow.) In the couple of times I got ahead of myself – that didn’t happen with the upgrade rails. While I’m on that topic - if for some reason the table to rail alignment (bearing slop) does get out of whack there will be adjustment ports thru the bottom of the rail to adjust the screws that hold the table to the rails. On the prototype rails I have, only one rail has adjustment ports. Keep in mind that if you remove the factory installed linear bearing housing that is attached to the rails, (the sliders) all hell will break loose and you will probably void your warranty, as you will have acetyl ball bearings showering all around you.

While we are on the topic of linear bearings here’s a brief animation with an x-ray view on how they work.
(I should note that the animation below is generic in form, and with no connection to BCTW’s linear bearings – I’m just showing the similarity of motion.)


Keep in mind that the bearings in the JMP upgrade are acetyl (to reduce the noise level & the wear on the track) This system requires no lubrication and has no need for constant re-adjustment on the table / rails. The hydroscopic movement due to weather changes to the original dovetail sliders is no longer an issue. The noise level is definitely higher on the upgrade version, to where if you were multi-tasking while on the phone your caller would know that you were up to something. (Not so on the JMP-v1 – I know, I’ve done it many a time) Working at 2 am in the morning is possible however, unless your spouse is a very heavy sleeper you might want to set up in the room adjacent to the bedroom rather than the bedroom itself.

As a somewhat close re-enactment of the sound level –go to a drawer in your kitchen with full extension slides – older Accuride style slides are best– and slide it back and forth - putting some weight on the front drawer-face, its a little louder than that rolling sound, not including the sounds/clicks you hear at full and closed extensions. (This re-enactment does not work with Blum hardware!)

And one more little detail… Did I say - No lubrication required!

The Big Question . . .

Will I order the upgrade? Without a hesitation - yes.
Am I upset that there is a significant upgrade, just shy of a year from its original introduction? Actually, no and no. For the first no – I’m glad BCTW’s was able to come up with a radical improvement on efficiency & ease of use on their next generation of JMP’s and make the improvement available as an upgrade on an existing design.
For the second - "no", having the original JMP allows me with very little modification to have the ability to switch for an expanded use, inappropriate here but soon but I will soon share my thoughts on the Bridge City Tools Forum.

What I am more surprised at is that they have made such a dramatic change in the design of the JMP series without an escalation in price. In the days ahead I will go into more detail of using the new system as a single table user (simulating the JMP-sw), but with what I’ve done up till now is that for the majority of the cuts, a single slider is very efficient and effective. I tested the single table idea because the new JMP SW only has one sliding table.

The Down Side . . .

I have to say that I’m trying very hard here to list the negatives,
And the negatives a more annoyances to work around with…

The first - being the access slot on the outside edge of each table. (The ones directly over the new rails) Once the back fence is set up, in order to put through either the short bolt or longer bolt for the wood clamp one needs to pull the table all the way forward so the slot on the table extends to over the back plate – so you then feed the bolt thru at that point. (See photo) On the JMP-v1, one accesses the outside slots through the ways to feed the bolt.

This may be a matter of the “Prototype” version, but the access slot for the feeding of the short bolts in front outside slots of the table (to hold the back fence) when extending the table over the front plate – is a very tight feed-through. That would be remedied by making the table/slot just a little bit longer.

The sound, you’ll get use to it – the JMP-v1 does have more of a Zen quality to it.

This is a surprise to me but using the JMP w/v2 upgrade rails, makes me want to use the tool more--resulting in one’s disappearance from household activities, chores & family movie watching.
Now that can be a huge positive or a huge negative—I’ll keep you posted!

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

In the next few weeks I'll be fielding questions from both forum members and visitors while I have use of the upgrade prototypes. I will also be documenting different clamping procedures and techniques that I have come to use.

all the best,
Roger Savatteri

Last edited by RogerSavatteri; 12-16-2009 at 11:32 AM.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #57 (permalink)  
Old 12-16-2009, 09:34 AM
Poto's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 8,788
Default Re: Bridge City Toolworks "Jointmaker Pro Upgrade" Review . . .

Thanks for that great review, Roger. You make it all very tempting for the as-yet un-JMP'd.

I know I'm not supposed to ask, but have to: what is that very cool stand-up clamp that you have? And what's with the little donuts on the clamping block? The stand-up clamp looks like something John and Co. could re-engineer, and make a super-elegant version of for JMP users...
__________________
I don't have as many Festools as Fred. Or Marcou's, or Brese's, or Lie-Nielsen's, or Lee Valley's, or Blue Spruce's, or Harold and Saxon's, or...
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #58 (permalink)  
Old 12-16-2009, 12:31 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 971
Default Re: Bridge City Toolworks "Jointmaker Pro Upgrade" Review . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Poto View Post
.... what is that very cool stand-up clamp that you have? And what's with the little donuts on the clamping block? ...
Peter,

thank you ,,,,,
and please, ask away!

I'm really getting to like that stand up clamp & you'll see me using it more in coming set-ups. It's called a rack clamp and the manufacturer is Des-taco and it's very lightweight and made from high strength glass reinforced nylon. It is non-metallic and resistant against chemicals. see.....http://www.dawntools.com.au/products...amps_34_81.pdf
Once upon a time Lee Valley was selling it & a couple of other composite models and then discontinued selling them. I picked them up when they were on special buy at the end with the intention of using them for some sort of jig or for fiberglass projects to use in conjunction with tooling set ups. I'm glad I did.
Keep in mind that in order to alleviate binding / flexing of the tabletops one needs to take care when applying too much pressure with the surface clamps.

As to the little donuts on the clamping block,,,, think tires on a tugboat.
Sometimes, depending on the workpiece to be held - I find the "tugboat tires" holds a bit firmer than the sandpaper.
I found them back in my misc. hardware drawers! - (you've been there!)
(they are held on with very strong double face tape)



.

Last edited by RogerSavatteri; 12-16-2009 at 06:02 PM.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #59 (permalink)  
Old 12-16-2009, 03:20 PM
Wonderwino's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Grew up in Peekskill, NY; Now living in Northwest Kansas
Posts: 2,677
Default Re: Bridge City Toolworks "Jointmaker Pro Upgrade" Review . . .

I might have to get one of these! (wife: )
__________________
Water separates the people of the world; wine unites them.

"If you have good manners and are well spoken, you can be welcome anywhere." -Mom, 1959
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #60 (permalink)  
Old 12-16-2009, 06:33 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: 41°N 79°W One of the Thirteen Original Colonies of the United States of America
Posts: 4,831
Default Re: Bridge City Toolworks "Jointmaker Pro Upgrade" Review . . .

Roger is going to be a very bad influence here as he shows off the capabilities of the new JMP...
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:29 PM.